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No sex, no violence, no news

Author: Ray ThomasSusan LambertStefan MoorePhilip BullSharon ConnollyAll authors
Publisher: Lindfield, NSW : Film Australia National Interest Program, 1995.
Edition/Format:   VHS video : VHS tape : National government publication   Visual material : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Television is central to the Chinese government's strategy of modernising China in the 1990s on its own terms. Only 2% of China's households have telephones but 80% have television sets. Entrepreneurs from Hong Kong and the West negotiate with bureaucrats to bring entertainment to the masses. The entrepreneurs tread carefully, applying strict self censorship ('no sex, no violence, no news') to programs beamed to the  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Government publication, National government publication, Videorecording
Document Type: Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Ray Thomas; Susan Lambert; Stefan Moore; Philip Bull; Sharon Connolly; Film Australia.
OCLC Number: 225851559
Credits: Executive producer, Sharon Connolly ; producers, directors, Stefan Moore, Susan Lambert ; photography, Philip Bull ; editor, Ray Thomas.
Description: 1 videocassette (VHS) (54 min.) : sd., col. ; 1/2 in.

Abstract:

Television is central to the Chinese government's strategy of modernising China in the 1990s on its own terms. Only 2% of China's households have telephones but 80% have television sets. Entrepreneurs from Hong Kong and the West negotiate with bureaucrats to bring entertainment to the masses. The entrepreneurs tread carefully, applying strict self censorship ('no sex, no violence, no news') to programs beamed to the Mainland. This program is a report on the state of play in the process of bringing officially sanctioned Hollywood-style fantasy to the Chinese masses.

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Linked Data


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