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No sympathy for the devil : Christian pop music and the transformation of American evangelicalism

Author: David W Stowe
Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, ©2011.
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In this cultural history of evangelical Christianity and popular music, David Stowe demonstrates how mainstream rock of the 1960s and 1970s has influenced conservative evangelical Christianity through the development of Christian pop music. For an earlier generation, the idea of combining conservative Christianity with rock--and its connotations of nonreligious, if not antireligious, attitudes--may have seemed  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: David W Stowe
ISBN: 9780807834589 0807834580 1469606879 9781469606873
OCLC Number: 668197728
Description: 291 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Contents: Jesus on the beach --
Jesus on Broadway --
Godstock --
Soul on Christ --
Hollywood's gospel road --
Let's get married --
Shock absorbers --
Year of the evangelical --
Crises of confidence --
Last days.
Responsibility: David W. Stowe.

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No Sympathy for the Devil: Christian Pop Music and the Transformation of American Evangelicalism  Read more...

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"Stowe's work stands out as one of the most compelling and entertaining examinations of evangelicalism that has been published in recent years. This book is an indispensible read for historians, Read more...

 
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