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Nobody's home : speech, self, and place in American fiction from Hawthorne to DeLillo

Author: Arnold L Weinstein
Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 1993.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Focusing on some of the deepest instincts of American life and culture--individual liberty, freedom of speech, constructing a life--Arnold Weinstein brilliantly sketches the remarkable career of the American self over the past one hundered fifty years in major works by such authors as Herman Melville and Mark Twain to contemporary authors such as Toni Morrison and Robert Coover. He contends that American writers  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Arnold L Weinstein
ISBN: 0195074939 9780195074932 019508022X 9780195080223
OCLC Number: 26096348
Description: xii, 349 p. ; 25 cm.
Contents: Hawthorne's "Wakefield" and the art of self-possession --
Melville : knowing Bartleby --
Stowe : ghosting in Uncle Tom's cabin --
Twain : the twinning principle in Puddn'head Wilson --
Anderson : the play of Winesburg, Ohio --
Flannery O'Connor and the art of displacement --
Fitzgerald's Great Gatsby : fiction as greatness --
Faulkner's As I lay dying : the voice from the coffin --
Faulkner : fusion and confusion in Light in August --
Hemingway's Garden of Eden : the final combat zone --
John Hawkes, skin trader --
Robert Coover : fiction as fission --
Dis-membering and re-membering in Toni Morrison's Beloved --
Don DeLillo : rendering the words of the tribe.
Responsibility: Arnold Weinstein.
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Abstract:

This study of American fiction examines closely the strong ties between language, history, and culture, with a particular focus on freedom of the self.  Read more...

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"New life is breathed into novels and stories which in most cases have been elaborately examined by a succession of earlier critics....Weinstein not only has a masterful command of the texts he deals Read more...

 
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