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Odes and epodes

Author: Horace.; Niall Rudd
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2004.
Series: Loeb classical library, 33.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"The poetry of Horace (born 65 BC) is richly varied, its focus moving between public and private concerns, urban and rural settings, Stoic and Epicurean thought. This new Loeb Classical Library edition of the great Roman poet's Odes and Epodes boasts a faithful and fluid translation and reflects current scholarship." "Horace took pride in being the first Roman to write a body of lyric poetry. For models he turned to  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Poetry
Translations
Translations into English
Anthologies
Poésie
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Horace.
Odes and epodes.
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2004
(OCoLC)607225491
Named Person: Horace; Horace; Horace; Horace.
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Horace.; Niall Rudd
ISBN: 0674996097 9780674996090
OCLC Number: 53144562
Language Note: Text in Latin with parallel translation in English.
Notes: Includes index.
Description: ix, 350 p. ; 17 cm.
Contents: Metres 12 --
Odes --
Hymn for a New Age 262 --
Epodes 270.
Series Title: Loeb classical library, 33.
Other Titles: Carmina.
Responsibility: Horace ; edited and translated by Niall Rudd.

Abstract:

"The poetry of Horace (born 65 BC) is richly varied, its focus moving between public and private concerns, urban and rural settings, Stoic and Epicurean thought. This new Loeb Classical Library edition of the great Roman poet's Odes and Epodes boasts a faithful and fluid translation and reflects current scholarship." "Horace took pride in being the first Roman to write a body of lyric poetry. For models he turned to Greek lyric, especially to the poetry of Alcaeus, Sappho, and Pindar; but his poems are set in a Roman context. His four books of odes cover a wide range of moods and topics. Some are public poems, upholding the traditional values of courage, loyalty, and piety; and there are hymns to gods. But most of the odes are on private themes: chiding or advising friends; speaking about love and amorous situations, often amusingly. Horace's seventeen epodes, which he called iambi, were also an innovation for Roman literature. Like the odes they were inspired by a Greek model: the seventh century iambic poetry of Archilochus. Love and political concerns are frequent themes; the tone is only occasionally aggressive. "In his language he is triumphantly adventurous," Quintilian said of Horace; Niall Rudd's new translation reflects his different voices."--BOOK JACKET.

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