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Of water and the spirit : ritual, magic, and initiation in the life of an African shaman

Author: Malidoma Patrice Somé
Publisher: New York : Putnam, ©1994.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Malidoma, whose name means "be friends with the stranger/enemy," was born under the shadow of French colonial rule in Upper Volta, West Africa. When he was four years old, he was taken by a Jesuit priest and imprisoned in a seminary built for training a new generation of "black" Catholic priests. In spite of his isolation from his tribe and his village, Malidoma stubbornly refused to forget where he had come from
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Genre/Form: Biography
Autobiography
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Somé, Malidoma Patrice, 1956-
Of water and the spirit.
New York : Putnam, c1994
(OCoLC)624432928
Named Person: Malidoma Patrice Somé; Malidoma Patrice Somé; Malidoma Patrice Somé; Malidoma Patrice Somé
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Malidoma Patrice Somé
ISBN: 0874777623 9780874777628
OCLC Number: 29386433
Notes: "A Jeremy P. Tarcher/Putnam book."
Description: 311 p. ; 24 cm.
Responsibility: Malidoma Patrice Somé.

Abstract:

Malidoma, whose name means "be friends with the stranger/enemy," was born under the shadow of French colonial rule in Upper Volta, West Africa. When he was four years old, he was taken by a Jesuit priest and imprisoned in a seminary built for training a new generation of "black" Catholic priests. In spite of his isolation from his tribe and his village, Malidoma stubbornly refused to forget where he had come from and who he was. Finally, fifteen years later, Malidoma fled the seminary and walked 125 miles through the dense jungle back to his own people, the Dagara. Once he was home, however, many there regarded him as a "white black," to be looked on with suspicion because he had been contaminated by the "sickness" of the colonial world. Malidoma was a man of two worlds, at home in neither.

His only hope of reconnection with his people was to undergo the harrowing Dagara monthlong initiation in the wilderness, which he describes in fascinating detail. Malidoma emerged from this supernatural ritual a newly integrated individual, rejoined to his ancestral past and his cultural present. For more than a century, anthropologists and ethnologists have attempted to penetrate the worldview of indigenous peoples. Now a true son of Africa has come forth, with the permission of his tribal elders, to tell us with stunning candor about their way of life. Today Malidoma flys the jetways writing on his laptop computer, seeking to share the ancient wisdom of the Dagara with the rest of the world and bring an understanding of another way of life to his village. His book is a courageous testament to the hope that humanity can learn to live in a global village and see the "stranger" as a friend.

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