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Of women, poetry, and power : strategies of address in Dickinson, Miles, Brooks, Lorde, and Angelou

Author: Zofia Burr
Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, ©2002.
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"The legacy of Emily Dickinson's life and work have shaped a romantic conception of women's poetry as private, personal, and expressive that has governed the reception of subsequent American women poets." "Of Women, Poetry, and Power demonstrates how the canonization of Dickinson has consolidated limiting assumptions about women's poetry in twentieth-century America and models an alternative reading practice that  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
History
Named Person: Emily Dickinson; Gwendolyn Brooks; Josephine Miles; Maya Angelou; Audre Lorde; Emily Dickinson; Gwendolyn Brooks; Josephine Miles; Maya Angelou; Audre Lorde; Emily Dickinson; Gwendolyn Brooks; Josephine Miles; Maya Angelou; Audre Lorde; Emily Dickinson; Josephine Miles; Gwendolyn Brooks; Audre Lorde; Maya Angelou; Maya Angelou; Gwendolyn Brooks; Emily Dickinson; Audre Lorde; Josephine Miles
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Zofia Burr
ISBN: 0252027698 9780252027697
OCLC Number: 50583134
Description: xii, 232 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: The Canonization of Emily Dickinson --
Josephine Miles and the Common Materials of Language --
Reading Gwendolyn Brooks across Audiences --
Audre Lorde and the Responsibility of the Reader --
Maya Angelou on the Inaugural Stage.
Responsibility: Zofia Burr.
More information:

Abstract:

"The legacy of Emily Dickinson's life and work have shaped a romantic conception of women's poetry as private, personal, and expressive that has governed the reception of subsequent American women poets." "Of Women, Poetry, and Power demonstrates how the canonization of Dickinson has consolidated limiting assumptions about women's poetry in twentieth-century America and models an alternative reading practice that allows for deeper engagement with the political work of modern poetry." "Analyzing the reception of poems by Josephine Miles, Gwendolyn Brooks, Audre Lorde, and Maya Angelou, Zofia Burr shows the persistence of these critical outlooks and dispels the belief that we have long since moved beyond such limiting gendered expectations. Turning away from an obsessive concern with a poet's biography, Burr's readings of contemporary women's poetry accentuate its engagement with and provocation of readers through its forms of address. Burr shows how displacing the limits of dominant reception is possible by approaching poetry as communicative utterance, not just as self-expression."--Jacket.

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