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On Aristotle's Meteorology 4

Author: Alexander, of Aphrodisias.
Publisher: Ithaca, N.Y. : Cornell University Press, 1996.
Series: Ancient commentators on Aristotle.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Aristotle's Meteorology Book 4 provides an account of the formation of minerals, metals, and other homogeneous stuffs. Eric Lewis argues that, in doing so, it offers fresh insight into Aristotle's conception of matter. The four elements (earth, air, fire, and water) do have matter, and their matter is the contraries - hot and cold, moist and dry. Lewis further argues that in the text translated here, the only extant  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Early works to 1800
Named Person: Aristotle.; Aristote.; Alexandre, d'Aphrodisias; AristÓteles; Aristoteles
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Alexander, of Aphrodisias.
ISBN: 0801432251 9780801432255
OCLC Number: 33044360
Description: 186 p. ; 24 cm.
Series Title: Ancient commentators on Aristotle.
Other Titles: On Aristotle's Meteorology four
Responsibility: Alexander of Aphrodisias ; translated by Eric Lewis.

Abstract:

Aristotle's Meteorology Book 4 provides an account of the formation of minerals, metals, and other homogeneous stuffs. Eric Lewis argues that, in doing so, it offers fresh insight into Aristotle's conception of matter. The four elements (earth, air, fire, and water) do have matter, and their matter is the contraries - hot and cold, moist and dry. Lewis further argues that in the text translated here, the only extant ancient commentary on the Meteorology, Alexander of Aphrodisias supports this interpretation of Aristotle. Such a conception of matter complements the account given at an earlier point in the corpus of Aristotle's works in On Generation and Corruption, and is confirmed by the account at later points in the biological works, although it adds further detail. Meteorology 4 emerges as an important book. Alexander's commentary is here translated into English for the first time.

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