skip to content
On the shifter hypothesis for the elimination of motion blur Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

On the shifter hypothesis for the elimination of motion blur

Author: Manfred Fahle; Whitaker College of Health Sciences, Technology, and Management. Center for Biological Information Processing.; Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and Center for Biological Information Processing, Whitaker College, [1990]
Series: A.I. memo, 1242.; C.B.I.P. paper, 56.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Abstract: "Objects moving at even moderate speeds stimulate many retinal photoreceptors within the integration time of the receptors, yet usually, no motion blur is experienced. An elegant model for the elimination of motion blur was proposed by Anderson and van Essen (1987) who suggested that the neuronal representation of the retinal image is shifted on its way to the cortex, in an opposite direction to the
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Manfred Fahle; Whitaker College of Health Sciences, Technology, and Management. Center for Biological Information Processing.; Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.
OCLC Number: 26610162
Notes: Caption title.
"August 1990."
Description: 13 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Series Title: A.I. memo, 1242.; C.B.I.P. paper, 56.
Responsibility: Manfred Fahle.

Abstract:

Abstract: "Objects moving at even moderate speeds stimulate many retinal photoreceptors within the integration time of the receptors, yet usually, no motion blur is experienced. An elegant model for the elimination of motion blur was proposed by Anderson and van Essen (1987) who suggested that the neuronal representation of the retinal image is shifted on its way to the cortex, in an opposite direction to the motion. Thus, the cortical representation of objects would be stationary at least during short periods of time. I have measured thresholds for two vernier stimuli, moving simultaneously into opposite directions over identical parts of the retina. Motion blur for these stimuli is not stronger than with a single moving stimulus, and thresholds can be below a photoreceptor diameter.

This result cannot be easily reconciled with the hypothesis of 'shifter circuits'."

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Related Subjects:(1)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/26610162>
library:oclcnum"26610162"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/26610162>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
<http://viaf.org/viaf/141940489>
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Artificial Intelligence Laboratory."
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1990"
schema:description"Abstract: "Objects moving at even moderate speeds stimulate many retinal photoreceptors within the integration time of the receptors, yet usually, no motion blur is experienced. An elegant model for the elimination of motion blur was proposed by Anderson and van Essen (1987) who suggested that the neuronal representation of the retinal image is shifted on its way to the cortex, in an opposite direction to the motion. Thus, the cortical representation of objects would be stationary at least during short periods of time. I have measured thresholds for two vernier stimuli, moving simultaneously into opposite directions over identical parts of the retina. Motion blur for these stimuli is not stronger than with a single moving stimulus, and thresholds can be below a photoreceptor diameter."@en
schema:description"This result cannot be easily reconciled with the hypothesis of 'shifter circuits'.""@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/28728317>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"On the shifter hypothesis for the elimination of motion blur"@en
schema:numberOfPages"13"
schema:publisher
schema:url

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.