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The one best way : Frederick Winslow Taylor and the enigma of efficiency

Author: Robert Kanigel
Publisher: New York : Viking, 1997.
Series: Sloan technology series.
Edition/Format:   book_printbook : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In the past man has been first. In the future the System will be first," predicted Frederick Winslow Taylor, the first efficiency expert and model for all the stopwatch-clicking engineers who stalk the factories and offices of the industrial world. In 1874, eighteen-year-old Taylor abandoned his wealthy family's plans for him to attend Harvard, and instead went to work as a lowly apprentice in a Philadelphia
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Kanigel, Robert.
One best way.
New York : Viking, 1997
(OCoLC)622813196
Named Person: Frederick Winslow Taylor; Frederick W Taylor; Frederick Winslow Taylor; Frederick Winslow Taylor; Frederick Winslow Taylor
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Robert Kanigel
ISBN: 0670864021 9780670864027
OCLC Number: 35814788
Description: xi, 675 pages, [16] pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Contents: A person of gentle breeding [1856-1874]. The bridge at Finstermunz --
Brookdale farm--
Foot soldier --
"Thee only do I want" --
Germantown days --
Rite of passage --
The crystal palace, again --
A stage, a battlefield --
"We welcome your return" --
The great triumvirate --
The wisest course --
Iron, fire, sand, and smoke [1874-1879]. Material world --
"An employment of some other kind" --
Pouring day --
Biography of an unknown man --
Centennial --
The master tools --
The education of an apprentice --
Connections --
The creation [1879-1886]. An interesting and capricious material --
Fighting blood --
Cutting edge --
Special arrangements--
Young America --
The leaning tower of Midvale --
A Faustian bargain --
Eden reclaimed --
A mechanical heaven --
A widening world [1886-1900]. The sign of the dollar --
New faces --
Boomtown on the Kennebec --
On the road --
"A partial solution" --
On the road, again --
"Finish excellent, chips blue" --
Uncommon labor --
A science of work? --
Afterthought --
House on the hill [1900-1910]. At the Bois de Vincennes --
The riddle of the Sphinx --
Explosion in Savannah --
The new order --
President and Dr. Taylor --
"I am going to point a way" --
A mere nothing? --
Behold the sower --
A stillness --
Judgment day [1910-1915]. A million dollars a day --
Storm clouds --
Thunderclap --
The special committee --
Report from the end of the century. The great diffusion --
Mr. progressive --
The fifteen unnecessary motions of a kiss --
The stopwatch and the jackboot --
Lost paradise --
A bargain reconsidered --
Death and life.
Series Title: Sloan technology series.
Responsibility: Robert Kanigel.
More information:

Abstract:

"In the past man has been first. In the future the System will be first," predicted Frederick Winslow Taylor, the first efficiency expert and model for all the stopwatch-clicking engineers who stalk the factories and offices of the industrial world. In 1874, eighteen-year-old Taylor abandoned his wealthy family's plans for him to attend Harvard, and instead went to work as a lowly apprentice in a Philadelphia machine shop, shuttling between the manicured hedges of his family's home and the hot, cussing, dirty world of the shop floor. As he rose through the ranks of management, he began the time-and-motion studies for which he would become famous, and forged his industrial philosophy, Scientific Management.

To organized labor, Taylor was a slave-driver. To the bosses, he was an eccentric who raised wages while ruling the factory floor with a stopwatch. To himself, he was a misunderstood visionary who, under the banner of Science, would confer prosperity on all and abolish the old class hatreds. To millions today who feel they give up too much to their jobs, Taylor is the source of that fierce, unholy obsession with "efficiency" that marks modern life. The assembly line; the layout of our kitchens; the ways our libraries, fastfood restaurants, and even our churches are organized all owe much to this driven man, who broke every job into its parts, sliced and trimmed and timed them, and remolded what was left into the work of the twentieth century.

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