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One market under God : extreme capitalism, market populism, and the end of economic democracy

Author: Thomas Frank
Publisher: New York : Doubleday, ©2000.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In One Market Under God, social critic Thomas Frank examines the morphing of the language of American democracy into the cant and jargon of the marketplace. Combining popular intellectual history with a survey of recent business culture, Frank traces an idea he calls "market populism" - the notion that markets are, in some transcendent way, identifiable with democracy and the will of the people. The belief that any  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Frank, Thomas, 1965-
One market under God.
New York : Doubleday, c2000
(OCoLC)681754033
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Thomas Frank
ISBN: 038549503X 9780385495035
OCLC Number: 44089199
Description: xviii, 414 p. ; 22 cm.
Contents: Preface: A Deadhead in Davos --
Getting to Yes: The Architecture of a New Consensus --
A Great Time or What: Market Populism Explains Itself --
The Democracy Bubble --
I Want My NYSE --
Casual Day, U.S.A.: Management's 1930s --
In Search of Legitimacy: How Business Got Its Soul Back --
The Brand and the Intellectuals --
New Consensus for Old: Cultural Studies from Left to Right --
Triangulation Nation: Journalism in the Age of Markets --
To the Dot-Com Station.
Responsibility: Thomas Frank.
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Abstract:

"In One Market Under God, social critic Thomas Frank examines the morphing of the language of American democracy into the cant and jargon of the marketplace. Combining popular intellectual history with a survey of recent business culture, Frank traces an idea he calls "market populism" - the notion that markets are, in some transcendent way, identifiable with democracy and the will of the people. The belief that any criticism of things as they are is elitist can be seen in management literature, where downsizing and ceaseless, chaotic change are celebrated as victories for democracy; in advertising, where an endless array of brands seek to position themselves as symbols of authenticity and rebellion; on Wall Street, where the stock market is identified as the domain of the small investor and common man; in newspaper publishing, where the vogue for focus-group-guided "civic journalism" is eroding journalistic independence and initiative; and in the right-wing politics of the 1990s and the popular social theories of George Gilder, Lester Thurow, and Thomas Friedman." "Frank's counterattack against the onslaught of market propaganda is mounted with the weapons of common sense, a genius for useful ridicule, and the older American values of economic justice and political democracy."--BOOK JACKET.

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schema:reviewBody""In One Market Under God, social critic Thomas Frank examines the morphing of the language of American democracy into the cant and jargon of the marketplace. Combining popular intellectual history with a survey of recent business culture, Frank traces an idea he calls "market populism" - the notion that markets are, in some transcendent way, identifiable with democracy and the will of the people. The belief that any criticism of things as they are is elitist can be seen in management literature, where downsizing and ceaseless, chaotic change are celebrated as victories for democracy; in advertising, where an endless array of brands seek to position themselves as symbols of authenticity and rebellion; on Wall Street, where the stock market is identified as the domain of the small investor and common man; in newspaper publishing, where the vogue for focus-group-guided "civic journalism" is eroding journalistic independence and initiative; and in the right-wing politics of the 1990s and the popular social theories of George Gilder, Lester Thurow, and Thomas Friedman." "Frank's counterattack against the onslaught of market propaganda is mounted with the weapons of common sense, a genius for useful ridicule, and the older American values of economic justice and political democracy."--BOOK JACKET."
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