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Open secrets

Author: Shelley Tepperman; Germaine Ying Gee Wong; José Torrealba; National Film Board of Canada.
Publisher: [Montréal] : National Film Board of Canada, 2003.
Edition/Format:   DVD video : National government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This documentary uncovers a lost chapter in Canadian military history : how the Armed Forces dealt with homosexual behaviour among soldiers, during and after World War II. A group of veterans break their silence after more than 60 years. We hear from five men, barely adults when they enlisted. From the sexual timidity of the 1930s, when homosexual behaviour "was even more unmentionable than cancer," spring these
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Genre/Form: Documentary films
Nonfiction films
Video recordings for the hearing impaired
Sources
Material Type: Government publication, National government publication, Videorecording
Document Type: Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Shelley Tepperman; Germaine Ying Gee Wong; José Torrealba; National Film Board of Canada.
OCLC Number: 69676632
Language Note: Closed-captioned.
Notes: Closed-captioned.
This video is based on the Paul Jackson book, Courting Homosexuals in the Military.
Credits: Editors: Antoine Saad, José Torrealba.
Description: 1 videodisc (52 min.) : sd., col. with b&w sequences ; 4 3/4 in.
Details: DVD.
Responsibility: direction and cinematography, José Torrealba ; narration written by Shelley Tepperman ; producer, Germaine Ying Gee Wong.

Abstract:

This documentary uncovers a lost chapter in Canadian military history : how the Armed Forces dealt with homosexual behaviour among soldiers, during and after World War II. A group of veterans break their silence after more than 60 years. We hear from five men, barely adults when they enlisted. From the sexual timidity of the 1930s, when homosexual behaviour "was even more unmentionable than cancer," spring these stories of sexual awakening amidst the brutality of war.

"Soldiers and officers who depended upon one another for survival accepted each other's differences. Initially, the Army overlooked homosexual activity, but as the war advanced, they began to crack down: military tribunals, threats of imprisonment, discharge and publlic exposure. After the war, officers accused of homosexuality were discharged. Back home in Canada, reputations and careers were ruined. For the young men who had served their country with valour, this final chapter was often too much to bear"--Container.

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Linked Data


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