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'Opening up' to intertexts : an analysis of intertextuality in works by Diana Wynne Jones and Neil Gaiman

Author: Gerardine Constance Petra D'Mello
Publisher: 2013.
Dissertation: M.A. University of Auckland 2013. English
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : Manuscript   Archival Material : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
By dividing the reading process into two parts: a naïve primary reading, devoid of interrogation into academic criticism, and an informed secondary reading which utilises said criticism and theory; this thesis analyses the effects of 'informed' intertextuality on the interpretations and perceptions constructed by a reader. The texts I have chosen to analyse are Fire and Hemlock (1985) and Deep Secret (1997) by  Read more...
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Details

Named Person: Diana Wynne Jones; Neil Gaiman
Material Type: Thesis/dissertation, Manuscript, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Archival Material, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Gerardine Constance Petra D'Mello
OCLC Number: 855806838
Notes: "A thesis submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of MA in English, the University of Auckland, 2013."
Description: 93 leaves : colour illustrations ; 30 cm
Responsibility: by Gerardine Constance Petra D'mello.

Abstract:

By dividing the reading process into two parts: a naïve primary reading, devoid of interrogation into academic criticism, and an informed secondary reading which utilises said criticism and theory; this thesis analyses the effects of 'informed' intertextuality on the interpretations and perceptions constructed by a reader. The texts I have chosen to analyse are Fire and Hemlock (1985) and Deep Secret (1997) by Diana Wynne Jones, and Neil Gaiman's Stardust (1999). Patterns of intertextuality observed during the initial naïve reading are the focus of the following chapters. Focus is placed on relationships between literary texts, connections to genre and culture, as well as the transformation of texts through adaption and changes in medium. The relationship between an author and his text is also a concern of intertextuality, and is discussed throughout the thesis, but specifically during a chapter dealing with the effects of intertexts upon originality and the power of the author. The reader's importance is also emphasised. Theorists such as Kristeva and Barthes, as well as Genette and Bloom, all inform my perception of intertextuality, giving me a frame-work through which to approach the texts. I have concluded that reading intertextual connections 'opens' up the reading process. A discussion about intertextuality has led to an appreciation of the amount of subversion and renewal which such relationships bring in terms of genre and characterisation, and even specific narratives. Areas of further study indicated by my discussions include the effect of the internet on originality and plagiarism, and the effect of consumerism on narrative.

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