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Oral history interview with Harry D. Huskey, ca. 1976.

Author: Harry D Huskey; Christopher Riche Evans
Edition/Format:   Archival material : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Huskey discusses his work on the ENIAC, ACE, and SWAC computers. As a mathematics professor at the University of Pennsylvania, he joined the Moore School of Electrical Engineering's ENIAC project in 1944, and with Arthur Burks wrote a technical description of the machine. Huskey credits much of the engineering to J. Presper Eckert, including the idea for stored programming. In 1946 Huskey went to the ACE project at
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Details

Genre/Form: Oral histories
Named Person: Arthur W Burks; J Presper Eckert; Alan Mathison Turing; Frederic Calland Williams
Document Type: Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Harry D Huskey; Christopher Riche Evans
OCLC Number: 63295599
In: Christopher Riche Evans, Pioneers of computing
Description: sound cassette : 1 (60 min.) : analog, mono.

Abstract:

Huskey discusses his work on the ENIAC, ACE, and SWAC computers. As a mathematics professor at the University of Pennsylvania, he joined the Moore School of Electrical Engineering's ENIAC project in 1944, and with Arthur Burks wrote a technical description of the machine. Huskey credits much of the engineering to J. Presper Eckert, including the idea for stored programming. In 1946 Huskey went to the ACE project at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in Great Britain. He tells of the University of Manchester project under the direction of Frederic Calland Williams, whose cathode ray tube Huskey recommended for the ACE. He discusses his interactions with Alan Turing, Turing's interest in artificial intelligence, and the events that led to Turing's resignation from the NPL.

Huskey returned to the United States in 1947 to work for the National Bureau of Standards (NBS). In 1948 he was assigned to design the SWAC, a computer being built by NBS and the UCLA Institute for Numerical Analysis. He describes how he followed the EDVAC in designing SWAC, its use of a mercury delay line memory, and its use from 1950 to 1967, primarily by Air Force contractors and UCLA mathematicians.

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Linked Data


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