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Oral history interview with Igal Roodenko, April 11, 1974 : interview B-0010, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).

Autor: Igal RoodenkoJacquelyn Dowd HallCharlotte AdamsJoseph FelmetJerry WingateTodos os autores
Editora: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2007.
Edição/Formato   e-book : Documento : Audiobook, etc. : Biografia : Publicação de governo estadual ou província   Gravação de Som : Inglês : Electronic ed
Base de Dados:WorldCat
Resumo:
Igal Roodenko was born to first-generation immigrants in New York City in 1917. Throughout the 1930s, Roodenko was drawn to leftist politics and pacifism. He describes the internal dilemma that he and other pacifists faced as they sought to reconcile their ideals of non-violence with their belief that Hitler's regime warranted opposition. Ultimately, Roodenko became a conscientious objector during the conflict.  Ler mais...
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Detalhes

Gênero/Forma: Oral histories
Interviews
Pessoa Denominada: Igal Roodenko; Joseph Felmet; Charlotte Adams
Tipo de Material: Biografia, Documento, Publicação do governo, Audiobook, etc., Publicação de governo estadual ou província, Recurso Internet
Tipo de Documento: Recurso Internet, Arquivo de Computador, Gravação de Som
Todos os Autores / Contribuintes: Igal Roodenko; Jacquelyn Dowd Hall; Charlotte Adams; Joseph Felmet; Jerry Wingate; Southern Oral History Program.; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Documenting the American South (Project); University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Library.
Número OCLC: 237116101
Notas: Title from menu page (viewed on July 30, 2008).
Interview participants: Igal Roodenko, interviewee; Joe Felmet, interviewee; Charlotte Adams, interviewee; Unidentified speaker; Jacquelyn Hall, interviewer; Jerry Wingate, interviewer.
Duration: 02:13:59.
This electronic edition is part of the UNC-CH digital library, Documenting the American South. It is a part of the collection Oral histories of the American South.
Text encoded by Mike Millner. Sound recordings digitized by Aaron Smithers.
Detalhes: Mode of access: World Wide Web.; System requirements: Web browser with Javascript enabled and multimedia player.
Outros Títulos: Oral histories of the American South.
Interview B-0010, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007)
Interview with Igal Roodenko, April 11, 1974

Resumo:

Igal Roodenko was born to first-generation immigrants in New York City in 1917. Throughout the 1930s, Roodenko was drawn to leftist politics and pacifism. He describes the internal dilemma that he and other pacifists faced as they sought to reconcile their ideals of non-violence with their belief that Hitler's regime warranted opposition. Ultimately, Roodenko became a conscientious objector during the conflict. Rather than facing a prison sentence for his refusal to bear arms, Roodenko spent most of World War II in a camp for conscientious objectors. Increasingly involved in leftist politics during the war, Roodenko participated in hunger strikes while at the camp and eventually did serve time in prison. Following the war, he utilized his experiences with peace groups and Ghandian non-violence to become a leader in the burgeoning civil rights movement. Roodenko speaks at length about his participation in the Journey of Reconciliation (1947). Already a member of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), Roodenko helped to organize the Journey, an interracial endeavor to test the Supreme Court's ruling in the Irene Morgan case (1946) as it applied to public transportation in the South. Roodenko describes the strategies CORE employed as they tested segregation policies on buses for Trailways and Greyhound. In Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Roodenko and fellow activists were arrested for refusing to abide by the bus driver's demand that black and white passengers not sit together. He recalls the threat of mob violence against the activists and the role of Chapel Hill minister Charles Jones in helping them escape town safely. Roodenko and the other CORE activists lost their court appeal and he spent 30 days working on a segregated chain gang in North Carolina. His recollections in this interview help to illuminate activist strategies, interracial cooperation, and reasons for limited success as the civil rights movement began to build momentum in the late 1940s.

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Dados Ligados


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