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Oral history interview with John W. Mauchly, 1976.

Author: John W Mauchly; Christopher Riche Evans
Edition/Format:   Archival material : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Mauchly describes his involvement with the ENIAC and EDVAC computers in this interview. Mauchly explains how his work in the 1930s on weather statistics led him to experiment with electronic calculating devices, and how this became an active project when he joined the Moore School of Engineering faculty in 1941. Mauchly recounts his early conversations with J. Presper Eckert on the feasibility of replacing
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Details

Genre/Form: Oral histories
Named Person: J Presper Eckert; Herman H Goldstine; John Von Neumann
Document Type: Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: John W Mauchly; Christopher Riche Evans
OCLC Number: 63288500
In: Christopher Riche Evans, Pioneers of computing
Notes: Recorded in Philadelphia, Pa.
Description: Sound cassette : 1 (60 min.) Transcript : 19 p.

Abstract:

Mauchly describes his involvement with the ENIAC and EDVAC computers in this interview. Mauchly explains how his work in the 1930s on weather statistics led him to experiment with electronic calculating devices, and how this became an active project when he joined the Moore School of Engineering faculty in 1941. Mauchly recounts his early conversations with J. Presper Eckert on the feasibility of replacing electromechanical relays with thousands of vacuum tubes. He then turns to the Army's funding of the ENIAC computer for use in preparing firing tables, and the important role of Herman Goldstine in securing funding.

Mauchly provides details on the small integrators built during the ENIAC's first phases, on John von Neumann's contributions to the project, and the technical innovations made during the machines early operation in the mid-1940s--including the development of stored programming that was designed into the ENIAC's successor, the EDVAC.

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