omitir hasta el contenido
Oral history interview with Julian Bond, November 1 and 22, 1999 : interview R-0345, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007). Ver este material de antemano
CerrarVer este material de antemano
Chequeando…

Oral history interview with Julian Bond, November 1 and 22, 1999 : interview R-0345, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).

Autor: Julian Bond; Elizabeth Gritter; Southern Oral History Program.; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Documenting the American South (Project); University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Library.
Editorial: [Chapel Hill, N.C.] : University Library, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2007.
Edición/Formato:   Libro-e : Documento : Libro de audio electrónico, etc. : Biografía : Publicación gubernamental estatal o provincial   Grabación sonora : Inglés (eng) : Electronic ed
Base de datos:WorldCat
Resumen:
As the son of Lincoln University president Horace Mann Bond, Julian Bond came into contact with black thinkers, musicians, and artists. The historically black Lincoln had served as a haven for black intelligentsia, but it also protected Bond from the pains of white racism. His parents sent him to a Quaker private school, where Bond learned pacifist principles. Upon graduating, Bond decided to attend Morehouse  Leer más
Calificación:

(todavía no calificado) 0 con reseñas - Ser el primero.

Temas
Más materiales como éste

 

Encontrar un ejemplar en línea

Encontrar un ejemplar en la biblioteca

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Encontrando bibliotecas que tienen este material…

Detalles

Género/Forma: Interviews
Persona designada: Julian Bond; Julian Bond
Tipo de material: Biografía, Documento, Publicación gubernamental, Libro de audio electrónico, etc., Publicación gubernamental estatal o provincial, Recurso en Internet
Tipo de documento: Recurso en Internet, Archivo de computadora, Grabación sonora
Todos autores / colaboradores: Julian Bond; Elizabeth Gritter; Southern Oral History Program.; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Documenting the American South (Project); University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Library.
Número OCLC: 276361060
Notas: Title from menu page (viewed on Nov. 25, 2008).
Interview participants: Julian Bond, interviewee; Elizabeth Gritter, interviewer.
Duration: 01:27:20.
This electronic edition is part of the UNC-Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South. It is a part of the collection Oral histories of the American South.
Text encoded by Jennifer Joyner. Sound recordings digitized by Aaron Smithers.
Detalles: Mode of access: World Wide Web.; System requirements: Web browser with Javascript enabled and multimedia player.
Otros títulos: Oral histories of the American South.
Interview R-0345, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007)
Interview with Julian Bond, November 1 and 22, 1999

Resumen:

As the son of Lincoln University president Horace Mann Bond, Julian Bond came into contact with black thinkers, musicians, and artists. The historically black Lincoln had served as a haven for black intelligentsia, but it also protected Bond from the pains of white racism. His parents sent him to a Quaker private school, where Bond learned pacifist principles. Upon graduating, Bond decided to attend Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia. There he became active in the civil rights movement while working on a local black newspaper. In his work with the newspaper, Bond witnessed whites' and black elites' opposition to the push for rapid racial change. The swelling protests among southern blacks, especially college students, piqued Bond's interest. His fervor led him to drop out of school, much to his parents' chagrin. Bond describes his involvement with the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and his connection with other activists, including Ella Baker, Martin Luther King, Jr., Bayard Rustin, John Lewis, Fannie Lou Hamer, Bob Moses, and Stokely Carmichael. The grassroots training experiences he gained working with local activists in Atlanta prepared him for voter registration organizing in rural southern counties. Bond explains the ideological tensions between SNCC and older civil rights activist groups. Many older activists, Bond argues, rejected younger blacks' radicalism as moving too fast, too soon. He discusses the growing internal divide that led to a black power camp and an integrationist camp within SNCC brought about by the inclusion of white Freedom Summer workers. Bond discusses his three successful bids for the Georgia House of Representatives and that body's refusal to seat him in 1966. In 1968, he formed a black challenge delegation to Georgia's all-white pro-segregation Democratic delegation at the Chicago convention. In the 1980s, Bond protested apartheid by boycotting stores that sold South African items.

Reseñas

Reseñas contribuidas por usuarios
Recuperando reseñas de GoodReads…
Recuperando reseñas de DOGObooks…

Etiquetas

Ser el primero.
Confirmar este pedido

Ya ha pedido este material. Escoja OK si desea procesar el pedido de todos modos.

Datos enlazados


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/276361060>
library:oclcnum"276361060"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/276361060>
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdfs:seeAlso
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://viaf.org/viaf/131314865>
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)"
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:bookEdition"Electronic ed."
schema:bookFormatschema:EBook
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
<http://viaf.org/viaf/128147403>
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Documenting the American South (Project)"
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
<http://viaf.org/viaf/148587154>
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Library."
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2007"
schema:description"As the son of Lincoln University president Horace Mann Bond, Julian Bond came into contact with black thinkers, musicians, and artists. The historically black Lincoln had served as a haven for black intelligentsia, but it also protected Bond from the pains of white racism. His parents sent him to a Quaker private school, where Bond learned pacifist principles. Upon graduating, Bond decided to attend Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia. There he became active in the civil rights movement while working on a local black newspaper. In his work with the newspaper, Bond witnessed whites' and black elites' opposition to the push for rapid racial change. The swelling protests among southern blacks, especially college students, piqued Bond's interest. His fervor led him to drop out of school, much to his parents' chagrin. Bond describes his involvement with the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and his connection with other activists, including Ella Baker, Martin Luther King, Jr., Bayard Rustin, John Lewis, Fannie Lou Hamer, Bob Moses, and Stokely Carmichael. The grassroots training experiences he gained working with local activists in Atlanta prepared him for voter registration organizing in rural southern counties. Bond explains the ideological tensions between SNCC and older civil rights activist groups. Many older activists, Bond argues, rejected younger blacks' radicalism as moving too fast, too soon. He discusses the growing internal divide that led to a black power camp and an integrationist camp within SNCC brought about by the inclusion of white Freedom Summer workers. Bond discusses his three successful bids for the Georgia House of Representatives and that body's refusal to seat him in 1966. In 1968, he formed a black challenge delegation to Georgia's all-white pro-segregation Democratic delegation at the Chicago convention. In the 1980s, Bond protested apartheid by boycotting stores that sold South African items."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/159184102>
schema:genre"Interviews."@en
schema:genre"Interviews"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Oral history interview with Julian Bond, November 1 and 22, 1999 interview R-0345, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007)."@en
schema:name"Interview R-0345, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007)"@en
schema:name"Interview with Julian Bond, November 1 and 22, 1999"@en
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:url<http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/R-0345/menu.html>

Content-negotiable representations

Cerrar ventana

Inicie una sesión con WorldCat 

¿No tienes una cuenta? Puede fácilmente crear una cuenta gratuita.