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Oral history interview with Roland S. Arriola, 1999

Author: Roland S Arriola; José Angel Gutíerrez; University of Texas at Arlington. Center for Mexican American Studies.
Edition/Format:   Archival material   Book : English
Publication:Center for Mexican American Studies Oral Histories, CMAS no. 172
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Roland (Rolando) S. Arriola begins with his family's background and his childhood experiences while attending one of the two segregated Catholic elementary schools in Edinburg, Texas. He conveys his developing interest in writing and journalism and cites the race discrimination he overcame to attend college. He tells about his mentor, Harry Quinn, editor of the 'Edinburgh Daily Review, ' and explains how he won a  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Oral histories
Interviews
Named Person: Mark White; Michael S Dukakis; Arriola family.; Harry Quinn; Oscar DuConge; Ramsey Muñiz
Material Type: Internet resource, Videorecording
Document Type: Archival Material, Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Roland S Arriola; José Angel Gutíerrez; University of Texas at Arlington. Center for Mexican American Studies.
OCLC Number: 429235371
Language Note: The interview was conducted primarily in English but portions are in Spanish, for which English translations are provided.
Notes: Interviewed by José Angel Gutiérrez on November 27, 1999 in Edinburg, Texas.
Description: 1 videocassette (VHS) (1 hr., 58 min.) : color ; 1/2 in. Transcript : 48 pages ; 28 cm
Other Titles: Tejano Voices
Center for Mexican American Studies Oral Histories
Mexican American Public Figures of Texas

Abstract:

Roland (Rolando) S. Arriola begins with his family's background and his childhood experiences while attending one of the two segregated Catholic elementary schools in Edinburg, Texas. He conveys his developing interest in writing and journalism and cites the race discrimination he overcame to attend college. He tells about his mentor, Harry Quinn, editor of the 'Edinburgh Daily Review, ' and explains how he won a Junior Historian essay contest (sponsored by the Texas Historical Commission). He recalls his feelings of alienation when he arrived in Waco and while attending Baylor University and talks about his early encounters with his future wife's Anglo-American family and their religious choices. He discusses his opportunities to write for the local newspaper, the 'Waco Tribune Herald, ' and touches on his work with the Community Action Agency program. He comments on the assistance of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF) to bring litigation against the schools in Waco to fight for desegration. He describes his cooperation with fellow councilman, African-American Oscar DuConge (who later became mayor of Waco) to win their election to the Waco City Council after a legal battle for single member districts and gives details on his campaign strategies. He speaks of his efforts at unifying the Hispanic population of Waco under the Alliance of Mexican Americans, consisting of three local Hispanic organizations: Sociedad Mutualista de Jornaleros, the Waco Missions, and the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), and the federal funding they received. He elaborates on his work with the city council and an investigation of alleged police brutality against a Mexican American. He discusses his election as mayor of Waco and notes his participation in Mark White's campaign for governor of Texas. He shares his struggle to complete his degree at Harvard while working for the state of Massachusetts under Governor Michael Dukakis and remarks on his opportunity to work in South Texas as director for the Center for Entrepreneurship and Economic Development at the University of Texas-Pan American upon his return to Texas. He gives his opinions on immigration and economic issues that effect South Texas, on interracial relations, and on the effectiveness of the Raza Unida Party. He mentions his work on Ramsey Muñiz's campaign for governor and briefly discusses his run for the Texas Senate in 1980.

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