skip to content
Oral history interview with Thomas Parke Hughes, 1980 Nov. 6. Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Oral history interview with Thomas Parke Hughes, 1980 Nov. 6.

Author: Thomas Parke Hughes; George D Green
Edition/Format:   Archival material : English
Publication:American business history, Program 10, IBM and the communications revolution, Oral history interviews
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This interview consists of two parts: in the first part Hughes provides a characterization of the process and impact of invention; and in the second part he outlines the development of the computer. Using the example of Thomas Edison, Hughes comments on invention as a response to need. He discusses the different ways in which research laboratories have been organized, depending on their relationships with businesses
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Oral histories
History
Named Person: J Presper Eckert; John W Mauchly; J Presper Eckert; John W Mauchly
Document Type: Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Thomas Parke Hughes; George D Green
OCLC Number: 63288491
Notes: Recorded in Minneapolis, Minn.
Description: Transcript : 20 p. Videocassettes : 3 (15 min. each) : U-matic, color.

Abstract:

This interview consists of two parts: in the first part Hughes provides a characterization of the process and impact of invention; and in the second part he outlines the development of the computer. Using the example of Thomas Edison, Hughes comments on invention as a response to need. He discusses the different ways in which research laboratories have been organized, depending on their relationships with businesses and the educational backgrounds of their personnel. These remarks lead Hughes to his overview of the invention of the first electronic digital calculator, the ENIAC, at the University of Pennsylvania during World War II.

Hughes tells of the Army's need for firing tables, and the enthusiasm and industry of the ENIAC project leaders John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert, in the face of skepticism from their colleagues.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/63288491>
library:oclcnum"63288491"
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/63288491>
rdf:typeschema:CreativeWork
rdf:typelibrary:ArchiveMaterial
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:contributor
schema:creator
schema:description"This interview consists of two parts: in the first part Hughes provides a characterization of the process and impact of invention; and in the second part he outlines the development of the computer. Using the example of Thomas Edison, Hughes comments on invention as a response to need. He discusses the different ways in which research laboratories have been organized, depending on their relationships with businesses and the educational backgrounds of their personnel. These remarks lead Hughes to his overview of the invention of the first electronic digital calculator, the ENIAC, at the University of Pennsylvania during World War II."
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/47462091>
schema:genre"History."
schema:genre"History"
schema:genre"Oral histories."
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Oral history interview with Thomas Parke Hughes,"
schema:numberOfPages"20"
schema:url

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.