skip to content
Order-preserving functions; applications to majorization and order statistics. Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Order-preserving functions; applications to majorization and order statistics.

Author: A W Marshall; D W Walkup; R J B Wets; BOEING SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH LABS SEATTLE WASH MATHEMATICS RESEARCH LAB.
Publisher: Ft. Belvoir Defense Technical Information Center DEC 1966.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
It has been common in the theory of reliability and its practice to assume that the life of a device is exponentially distributed (i.e. it has constant hazard or failure rate) or intuitively, that the device does not wear in service. This assumption is mathematically convenient, but it should not be employed without verification of its tenability from actual data. Natural alternatives to constant hazard rate are  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: A W Marshall; D W Walkup; R J B Wets; BOEING SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH LABS SEATTLE WASH MATHEMATICS RESEARCH LAB.
OCLC Number: 227438806
Description: 30 p.

Abstract:

It has been common in the theory of reliability and its practice to assume that the life of a device is exponentially distributed (i.e. it has constant hazard or failure rate) or intuitively, that the device does not wear in service. This assumption is mathematically convenient, but it should not be employed without verification of its tenability from actual data. Natural alternatives to constant hazard rate are increasing hazard rate and increasing hazard rate average, which correspond to the intuitive concept of wear-out. Recently, methods have been developed for reliability analysis based on these alternatives. Various statistical tests of the hypothesis of constant hazard rate versus the alternatives of increasing hazard rate (IHR) or increasing hazard rate average (IHRA) have been proposed. A good test must be unbiased, i.e., must yield the conclusion of constant hazard rate more often when it is true than when it is not. Such unbiased tests are those based upon functions that preserve a certain unusual vector ordering, that is, upon functions f such that f(x sub 1, ..., x sub n) <f(y sub 1, ..., y sub n) whenever (x sub 1, ..., x sub n) the vector ordering (y sub 1, ..., y sub n). Among other results, this paper presents criteria for determining whether or not a function preserves the vector ordering, i.e. whether or not the related test of constant hazard rate versus IHR or IHRA is unbiased.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/227438806>
library:oclcnum"227438806"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:datePublished"1966"
schema:datePublished"DEC 1966"
schema:description"It has been common in the theory of reliability and its practice to assume that the life of a device is exponentially distributed (i.e. it has constant hazard or failure rate) or intuitively, that the device does not wear in service. This assumption is mathematically convenient, but it should not be employed without verification of its tenability from actual data. Natural alternatives to constant hazard rate are increasing hazard rate and increasing hazard rate average, which correspond to the intuitive concept of wear-out. Recently, methods have been developed for reliability analysis based on these alternatives. Various statistical tests of the hypothesis of constant hazard rate versus the alternatives of increasing hazard rate (IHR) or increasing hazard rate average (IHRA) have been proposed. A good test must be unbiased, i.e., must yield the conclusion of constant hazard rate more often when it is true than when it is not. Such unbiased tests are those based upon functions that preserve a certain unusual vector ordering, that is, upon functions f such that f(x sub 1, ..., x sub n) "@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1807759196>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Order-preserving functions; applications to majorization and order statistics."@en
schema:numberOfPages"30"
schema:publication
schema:publisher
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.