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The origin and evolution of cultures

Author: Robert Boyd; Peter J Richerson
Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2005.
Series: Evolution and cognition.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:

The Origin and Evolution of Cultures presents articles based on two notions. That culture is crucial for understanding human behaviour; and that culture is part of biology. Interest in this  Read more...

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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Boyd, Robert.
Origin and evolution of cultures.
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2005
(DLC) 2004043408
(OCoLC)54487389
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Robert Boyd; Peter J Richerson
ISBN: 1423756851 9781423756859 0195165241 9780195165241 019518145X 9780195181456
OCLC Number: 64590314
Description: 1 online resource (viii, 456 p.) : ill.
Contents: 1: The evolution of social learning --
Social learning and adaptation --
Why does culture increase human adaptability? --
Why culture is common, but cultural evolution is rare --
Climate, culture, and the evolution of cognition --
Norms and bounded rationality --
2: Ethnic groups and markers --
The evolution of ethnic markers --
Shared norms and the evolution of ethnic markers / with Richard McElreath --
3: Human cooperation, reciprocity, and group selection --
The evolution of reciprocity in sizable groups --
Punishment allows the evolution of cooperation (or anything else) in sizable groups --
Why people punish defector: weak conformist transmission can stabilize costly enforcement of norms in cooperative dilemmas / with Joseph Henrich --
Can group-functional behaviors evolve by cultural group selection? an empirical test / with Joseph Soltis --
Group-beneficial norms can spread rapidly in a structured population --
The evolution of altruistic punishment / with Herbert Gintis, Samuel Bowles --
Cultural evolution of human cooperation / with Joseph Henrich --
4: Archaeology and culture history --
How microevolutionary processes give rise to history --
Are cultural phylogenies possible? / with Monique Borgerhoff Mulder, William H. Durham --
Was agriculture impossible during the Pleistocene but mandatory during the Holocene? a climate change hypothesis / with Robert L. Bettinger --
5: Links to other disciplines --
Rationality, imitation, and tradition --
Simple models of complex phenomena: the case of cultural evolution --
Memes: universal acid or a better mousetrap?
Series Title: Evolution and cognition.
Responsibility: Robert Boyd, Peter J. Richerson.
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There is much to learn from the work of Boyd and Richerson, and the initiative to bring together some of their scattered papers in this volume is laudable. Many professional anthrologists, Read more...

 
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