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The origin of species by means of natural selection : or, The preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life

Author: Charles Darwin; J W Burrow
Publisher: Harmondsworth : Penguin, 1968.
Series: Penguin classics.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The publication of Darwin's The Origin of Species in 1859 marked a dramatic turning point in scientific thought. The volume had taken Darwin more than twenty years to publish, in part because he envisioned the storm of controversy it was certain to unleash. Indeed, selling out its first edition on its first day, The Origin of Species revolutionized science, philosophy, and theology. Darwin's reasoned, documented  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Charles Darwin; J W Burrow
ISBN: 0140432051 9780140432053
OCLC Number: 42644
Notes: Includes glossary.
Description: 477 pages : illustrations, facsimile ; 18 cm.
Contents: 1. Variation Under Domestication --
2. Variation under Nature --
3. Struggle for Existence --
4. Natural Selection --
5. Laws of Variation --
6. Difficulties on Theory --
7. Instinct --
8. Hybridism --
9. On the Imperfection of the Geological Record --
10. On the Geological Succession of Organic Beings --
11. Geographical Distribution --
12. Geographical Distribution (continued) --
13. Mutual Affinities of Organic Beings: Morphology: Embryology: Rudimentary Organs --
14. Recapitulation and Conclusion.
Series Title: Penguin classics.
Other Titles: On the origin of species
Preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life
Responsibility: Charles Darwin ; edited with an introduction by J.W. Burrow.

Abstract:

The publication of Darwin's The Origin of Species in 1859 marked a dramatic turning point in scientific thought. The volume had taken Darwin more than twenty years to publish, in part because he envisioned the storm of controversy it was certain to unleash. Indeed, selling out its first edition on its first day, The Origin of Species revolutionized science, philosophy, and theology. Darwin's reasoned, documented arguments carefully advance his theory of natural selection and assertion that species were not created all at once by a divine hand but started with a few simple forms that mutated and adapted over time. Whether commenting on his own ill health, discussing his experiments to test instinct in bees, or relating a conversation about a South American burrowing rodent, Darwin's monumental achievement is surprisingly personal and delightfully readable. Its ideas remain extremely profound even today, making it the most influential book in the natural sciences ever written -- a work not just important to its time, but to the history of humankind.

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