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Origins of the Dred Scott case : Jacksonian jurisprudence and the Supreme Court, 1837-1857

Author: Austin Allen
Publisher: Athens, Ga. : University of Georgia Press, ©2006.
Series: Studies in the legal history of the South.
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The Supreme Court's 1857 Dred Scott decision denied citizenship to African Americans and enabled slavery's westward expansion. It has long stood as a grievous instance of justice perverted by sectional politics. Austin Allen finds that the outcome of Dred Scott hinged not on a single issue-slavery-but on a web of assumptions, agendas, and commitments held collectively and individually by Chief Justice Roger B. Taney  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Sources
Named Person: Dred Scott; John F A Sanford; Dred Scott; John F A Sanford; Dred Scott; Dred Scott, Sklave.; John F A Sanford; Dred Scott
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Austin Allen
ISBN: 9780820326535 0820326534 9780820328423 0820328421
OCLC Number: 61362101
Description: x, 274 pages ; 24 cm.
Contents: Realizing popular sovereignty : partisan sentiment and constitutional constraint in Jacksonian jurisprudence --
Imposing self-rule : professionalism, commerce, social order, and the sources of Taney court jurisprudence --
Evidence of law : popular sovereignty and judicial authority in Swift v. Tyson --
Toward Dred Scott : slavery, corporations, and popular sovereignty in the web of law --
Moderating Taney : concurrent sovereignty and answering the slavery question, 1842-1852 --
The limits of judicial partisanship : corporate law and the emergence of southern factionalism --
The sources of southern factionalism : corporations, free blacks, and the imperatives of federal citizenship --
Inescapable opportunity : the Supreme Court and the Dred Scott case --
The failure of evasion : Dred Scott v. Emerson, Strader v. Graham, Swift v. Tyson, and Dred Scott v. Sandford --
The political economy of blackness : citizenship, corporations, and the judicial uses of racism in Dred Scott --
Looking westward : concurrent sovereignty and the answer to the territorial question.
Series Title: Studies in the legal history of the South.
Responsibility: Austin Allen.
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Abstract:

The Supreme Court's 1857 Dred Scott decision denied citizenship to African Americans and enabled slavery's westward expansion. The author tracks arguments made by Taney Court justices in the two  Read more...

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"Here is a wealth of new insight into the internal dynamics of the Taney Court and the origins of its most infamous decision"--"McCormick Messenger"<p>

 
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