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The origins of totalitarianism

Author: Hannah Arendt
Publisher: New York : Harcourt, Brace and Co., ©1951.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Pt. 1 (p. 1-120), "Antisemitism", focuses on antisemitism in Western Europe in the late 19th-early 20th century, dismissing views that antisemitism was an outgrowth of nationalism. The conspicuous rise of antisemitism in the late 19th century coincided with the decay of the nation state and with the rise of totalitarian society - in particular, with the development of racism and Nazism rather than nationalism. The  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Arendt, Hannah, 1906-1975.
Origins of totalitarianism.
New York : Harcourt, Brace and Co., ©1951
(OCoLC)614621197
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Hannah Arendt
OCLC Number: 1163364
Description: xv, 477 pages ; 25 cm
Contents: pt. 1: Antisemitism as an outrage to common sense. The Jews, the nation-state, and the birth of antisemitism ; The Jews and society ; The Dreyfus Affair --
pt. 2: Imperialism. The political emancipation of the bourgeoisie ; Race-thinking before racism ; Race and bureaucracy ; Continental imperialism : the pan-movements ; The decline of the nation-state and the end of the rights of man --
pt. 3: Totalitarianism. A classless society ; The totalitarian movement ; Totalitarianism in power.
Responsibility: by Hannah Arendt.

Abstract:

Pt. 1 (p. 1-120), "Antisemitism", focuses on antisemitism in Western Europe in the late 19th-early 20th century, dismissing views that antisemitism was an outgrowth of nationalism. The conspicuous rise of antisemitism in the late 19th century coincided with the decay of the nation state and with the rise of totalitarian society - in particular, with the development of racism and Nazism rather than nationalism. The nation state of the 17th-18th centuries supported the presence of Jews as a group because it needed their specific economic and social functions. Modern antisemitism began with the rise of the bourgeoisie class, which brought about the decay of the nation state, and with the parallel decay of traditional Judaism. Forces that opposed this state saw the Jews as representing its epitome, thus Jewry, disintegrating and increasingly weak, became their target. Devoid of the state's support and of their former influence, unnecessary as a social class, but retaining their wealth, the Jews were an ideal target of hatred. Accuses Western Jewry of political blindness, and of the lack of unity; the hatred of privileged Jews toward their unprivileged fellow-Jews was no less strong than the anti-Jewish sentiments of antisemites. Argues that some of the Jews, fascinated with reactionary ideas and racism, like Disraeli, also bear responsibility for the rise of Nazism. Dwells on the Dreyfus Affair, which paved the way for French fascism and the Pétain regime.

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