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Our posthuman future : consequences of the biotechnology revolution

Author: Francis Fukuyama
Publisher: Princeton, N.J. : Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic, 2003.
Edition/Format:   Audiobook on CD : CD audio : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In 1989, [the author] made his now-famous pronouncement that because "the major alternatives to liberal democracy had exhausted themselves," history as we knew it had reached its end. Ten years later, he revised his argument: we hadn't reached the end of history, he wrote, because we hadn't yet reached the end of science. Arguing that our greatest advances still to come will be in the life sciences, [he] now asks  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Audio book, etc.
Document Type: Sound Recording
All Authors / Contributors: Francis Fukuyama
OCLC Number: 52776663
Notes: Originally published: New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux, c2002. 1st ed.
Description: 1 sound disc : digital, mono. ; 4 3/4 in.
Contents: Pathways to the future: Tale of two dystopias; Sciences of the brain; Neuropharmacology and the control of behavior; Prolongation of life; Genetic engineering; Why we should worry --
Begin human: Human rights; Human nature; Human dignity --
What to do: Political control of biotechnology; How biotechnology is regulated today; Policies for the future.
Responsibility: Francis Fukuyama.

Abstract:

In 1989, [the author] made his now-famous pronouncement that because "the major alternatives to liberal democracy had exhausted themselves," history as we knew it had reached its end. Ten years later, he revised his argument: we hadn't reached the end of history, he wrote, because we hadn't yet reached the end of science. Arguing that our greatest advances still to come will be in the life sciences, [he] now asks how the ability to modify human behavior will affect liberal democracy. To re-orient contemporary debate, [he] underlines man's changing understanding of human nature through history: from Plato and Aristotle's belief that man had "natural ends," to the ideals of utopians and dictators of the modern age who sought to remake mankind for ideological ends. [He] persuasively argues that the ultimate prize of the biotechnology revolution-intervention in the "germ-line," the ability to manipulate the DNA of all of one person's descendents-will have profound, and potentially terrible, consequences for our political order, even if undertaken by ordinary parents seeking to "improve" their children. In [this book, he] begins to describe the potential effects of exploration on the foundation of liberal democracy: the belief that human beings are equal by nature.-Dust jacket.

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Linked Data


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