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The paradoxes of the American presidency

Author: Thomas E Cronin; Michael A Genovese
Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 1998.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
What exactly do Americans want from their president? A strong, innovative leader or someone who simply follows the will of the people? A president who insists on the ideals of a party or someone who builds bipartisan support? A president who exercises power forcefully or someone who establishes consensus before doing anything? The answer, according to Thomas E. Cronin and Michael A. Genovese in their new book, The  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Cronin, Thomas E.
Paradoxes of the American presidency.
New York : Oxford University Press, 1998
(OCoLC)605166600
Online version:
Cronin, Thomas E.
Paradoxes of the American presidency.
New York : Oxford University Press, 1998
(OCoLC)609211509
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Thomas E Cronin; Michael A Genovese
ISBN: 0195116925 9780195116922 0195116933 9780195116939
OCLC Number: 37315382
Description: viii, 438 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: 1. Presidential Paradoxes 2. Electing the American President 3. Evaluating Presidential Performance 4. Presidential Power and Leadership 5. The Presidential Job Description in a Separated System 6. The President and Congress 7. The President and Political Parties 8. The President and the Supreme Court 9. The President and Cabinet 10. The American Vice Presidency 11. "If Men Were Angels ...": Presidential Leadership and Accountability.
Responsibility: Thomas E. Cronin, Michael A. Genovese.
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What, exactly, do Americans want from their president? The authors of this study assert that the American people's expectations of their leader constitute a range of paradoxes: that the president be  Read more...

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"The scholarship throughout is first-rate....The authors are to be commended for this outstanding accomplishment. They have summarized a massive literature, added their own considerable insights, and Read more...

 
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schema:description"What exactly do Americans want from their president? A strong, innovative leader or someone who simply follows the will of the people? A president who insists on the ideals of a party or someone who builds bipartisan support? A president who exercises power forcefully or someone who establishes consensus before doing anything? The answer, according to Thomas E. Cronin and Michael A. Genovese in their new book, The Paradoxes of the American Presidency, is that Americans want the president to be a leader and a follower, partisan and bipartisan, innovative and conservative. For example, we expect our presidents to provide visionary leadership, and yet at the same time to be ever-sensitive to public opinion polls. We want a president with the power to solve the nation's problems, yet we are inherently suspicious of centralized leadership and the abuse of power. Such conflicting demands put the president in an often impossible position. Indeed, Cronin and Genovese contend the duties and challenges of the office are so capacious and the public's expectations often so inconsistent that whatever course of action a president takes may result in a "damned if you do, damned if you don't" kind of criticism. While there is no easy way out of the constant paradoxical dilemmas presidents face, there are ways to deal with these conflicting and sometimes inflated expectations. Yet even master political statecraft is often inadequate in reconciling the paradoxes of the American presidency."@en
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