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Parenting, Inc. : how we are sold on $800 strollers, fetal education, baby sign language, sleeping coaches, toddler couture, and diaper wipe warmers--and what it means for our children Preview this item
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Parenting, Inc. : how we are sold on $800 strollers, fetal education, baby sign language, sleeping coaches, toddler couture, and diaper wipe warmers--and what it means for our children

Author: Pamela Paul
Publisher: New York : Times Books/Henry Holt and Co., 2008.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
A leading social critic goes inside the billion-dollar baby business to expose the marketing and the myths, helping parents determine what's worth their money and what's a waste. Pamela Paul investigates the marketing hype, peer pressure, and easy consumerism that spins parents into purchasing overpriced products and raising overprotected, overstimulated, and over-provided-for children. Paul shows how the parenting  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Pamela Paul
ISBN: 9780805082494 0805082492
OCLC Number: 173659542
Description: 307 p. ; 25 cm.
Contents: Introduction: The mother load --
Gearing up --
Target : parents --
Trouble in toyland --
Let us edutain you --
Class time --
Pampered --
Outsourcing parenthood --
Conclusion: the bottom line.
Responsibility: Pamela Paul.
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Abstract:

A leading social critic goes inside the billion-dollar baby business to expose the marketing and the myths, helping parents determine what's worth their money and what's a waste. Pamela Paul investigates the marketing hype, peer pressure, and easy consumerism that spins parents into purchasing overpriced products and raising overprotected, overstimulated, and over-provided-for children. Paul shows how the parenting industry has persuaded parents that they cannot trust their children's health, happiness, and success to themselves. She offers a behind-the-scenes look at the baby business so that any parent can decode the claims-and discover shockingly unuseful products and surprisingly effective services. And she interviews educators, psychologists, and parents to reveal why the best thing for a baby is to break the cycle of self-recrimination and indulgence that feeds into overspending. Paul's book leads the way for every parent who wants to escape the spiral of fear, guilt, competition, and consumption that characterizes modern American parenthood.--From publisher description.

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