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The perfect house : a journey with the Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio

Author: Witold Rybczynski
Publisher: New York : Scribner, ©2002.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Before Andrea Palladio began designing his simple, gracious, perfectly proportioned villas, architectural genius was reserved for temples and palaces. Palladio elevated the architecture of the private house into an art form, and he not only designed and built, he wrote. His late-sixteenth-century architectural treatises were read and studied by great thinkers as diverse as Thomas Jefferson and Inigo Jones,  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Rybczynski, Witold.
Perfect house.
New York : Scribner, c2002
(OCoLC)606890974
Named Person: Andrea Palladio; Andrea Palladio
Material Type: Biography, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Witold Rybczynski
ISBN: 0743205863 9780743205863
OCLC Number: 49550978
Description: xvii, 266 p. : ill., map ; 23 cm.
Contents: 1. Godi --
2. Che Bella casa --
3. The arched device --
4. On the Brenta --
5. Porticoes --
6. The Brothers Barbaro --
7. An immensely pleasing sight --
8. Emo --
9. The last villa --
10. Palladio's secret.
Responsibility: Witold Rybczynski.
More information:

Abstract:

This title reveals the origins of the architecture of the private house, an art first practiced by Andrea Palladio. It reveals why Palladio's villas were so architectually and culturally influential,  Read more...

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Cheryl MendelsonAuthor of "Home Comforts"Rybczynski leads us through Palladio's beautiful villas, illuminating each room for its own sake and helping us understand what Palladio thought was ?the Read more...

 
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schema:reviewBody""Before Andrea Palladio began designing his simple, gracious, perfectly proportioned villas, architectural genius was reserved for temples and palaces. Palladio elevated the architecture of the private house into an art form, and he not only designed and built, he wrote. His late-sixteenth-century architectural treatises were read and studied by great thinkers as diverse as Thomas Jefferson and Inigo Jones, profoundly influencing the design of Monticello, the tidewater plantation houses of Virginia, and the White House. All across America today, Palladio's influence is evident in ample porches and columned porticoes, in grand ceiling heights and front-door pediments." "In The Perfect House, Witold Rybczynski, whose books on domestic and landscape architecture have transformed our understanding of parks and buildings, looks at Palladio's famous villas, not with the eye of an art historian but with the eye of an architect. He wanted to know why a handful of houses in an obscure corner of the Venetian Republic should have made their presence felt hundreds of years later and halfway across the globe."--BOOK JACKET."
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