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The personal rule of Charles I

Autore: Kevin Sharpe
Editore: New Haven : Yale University Press, 1992.
Edizione/Formato:   Libro : EnglishVedi tutte le edizioni e i formati
Banca dati:WorldCat
Sommario:
"In 1625 Charles I succeeded to the throne of a nation heavily involved in a European war and deeply divided by religious controversy. Within four years he had dissolved Parliament and begun a period of eleven years of personal rule. In the first, monumental and massively researched history of the King's personal rule, Kevin Sharpe has written a work of unprecedented importance in the debate on the origins of the
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Persona incaricata: Charles, King of England; Charles, King of England.; Charles, roi d'Angleterre; Charles, King of England
Tipo documento: Book
Tutti gli autori / Collaboratori: Kevin Sharpe
ISBN: 0300056885 9780300056884 0300065965 9780300065961
Numero OCLC: 25832187
Descrizione: xxiii, 983 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contenuti: Pt. I. 'All the Shame on Us': War and Dishonour. I. 'The Funeral of Our Parliament': The Origins of Personal Rule. Love and diplomacy. The sinews of war: finance. The logistics of war: soldiers. The experience of war: government. War, law and parliament. The king and his minister. A last session? Personal rule --
Pt. II. 'The Medicine of a Settled Government': Peace and Reformation 1629-35. II. Pax Carolana: Peace and Diplomacy. The treaties with France and Spain. England and Spain 1630-5. England and the Dutch 1630-5. England and Sweden 1630-5. England and France 1630-5. Interests and diplomatic objectives. English diplomacy and the Palatinate. The navy. III. The Search for the King's 'Mines': Revenue and Finance. Traditional revenues. Knighthood and forest fines. Projects and patents. Credit. Trade and customs revenues. IV. Portraits of Power: Personalities and Factions. Wentworth and Laud. Weston and Cottington. Men of business. Magnates and 'courtiers'. Henrietta Maria. Factions. Charles I. V. 'A Rule of Order in His Own House': The Reformation of the Court and Administration. The court. The politics of court culture. The household below stairs. The commission for fees. Reform and regulation. Reform and enterprise. Projects and improvements. The Privy Council. VI. 'The Right Estate of the Church': Charles I, William Laud and the Reformation of the Church. The king and the church. Archbishop Laud. Theological wrangles. The Catholics and Rome. The economic problems of the church. The fabric of the church. St Paul's. Ceremonies. The altar controversies. Henry Sherfield: a case study in complexities. Churches abroad and foreign congregations at home. The Book of Sports. Perceptions of religious controversies. The bishops and the dioceses. Matthew Wren and the diocese of Norwich. The court of High Commission. The religion of most Protestants? The clergy and the laity. VII. 'Order Through All Parts of Our Kingdoms'? The Governance of the Localities. The imperial capital. The communication of ideals. The justices of assize. The commission of the peace. The constables. The Privy Council and local government. The Councils of the North and the Marches. The Book of Orders. Dearth. The employment of the poor. Enclosures and depopulation. Poor relief. Vagrancy and social order. The regulation of the alehouse. The Book of Orders: a review. The quest for an 'exact militia'. The deputy lieutenants --
Pt. III. 'A Turn of All Affairs': Changed Circumstances and New Counsels. VIII. 'A Change of Policy': England and Europe 1635 to 1637. The Peace of Prague. The year of the three embassies: Arundel's mission to Vienna. The year of the three embassies: Aston in Spain. The year of the three embassies: Leicester in France. IX. 'The Dominion of the Sea'? Factional Change and Foreign Priorities. The rise of the queen's men. The defence of the realm: the militia. The defence of the realm: the origins of ship money. The ship money writs. The sheriffs. Ship money: administrative problems and disputes. The payment of ship money. The ship money fleets. New priorities --
Pt. IV. Co-Operation and Confrontation: Reactions to the Personal Rule 1629-37. X. 'The Greatest Measure of Felicity'? Conditions and Circumstances. Material conditions. Halcyon days? Enduring problems. New burdens. Local difficulties. Plague. Co-operation or obstruction? Case studies: Bristol. Case studies: York. XI. 'Itching Ears to Hear Anything Against the Commonwealth'? Censorship, Criticism and Constitutionalism. Censorship of the press. The control of private papers and archives. The king and his judges. The Star Chamber. Fear of the censor? Newsletters and politics. Diaries and memoirs. A longed-for parliament? Criticism and counsel. Riot. Responses to the regime. Legal and constitutional opposition? XII. 'Factious and Schismatical Humours': Puritanism and Opposition. The conformity of the godly? The strength of puritanism. The 'puritan exodus'? The trial of Prynne, Burton and Bastwick --
Pt. V. 'The First Alarm of Any Touble': Charles I and the Scots. XIII. 'The Fatal Advertency': The Prayer Book and the War Between the Kingdoms. 1637: The critical year? The king of Scotland's coronation. The Prayer Book and the canons. The troubles. The road to war. English perceptions. Mobilization for war. The military odds. Skirmish and negotiation. The war and the localities. Perceptions and propaganda. XIV. 'A Very Ill Time': Foreign Affairs, Factions and Fears. 'A more obliging way' to Spain. The breakdown of the peace. Factions and fears. The spectre of popery --
Pt. VI. 'The Cross Humours of the People'? The End of Personal Rule. XV. 'A Bed of Reconciliation'? The Short Parliament. Origins and elections. The hopes of a parliament. The king's business or the country's? The dissolution. The Convocation and the canons. XVI. 'Who Enters the North First Will Carry It': The Renewal of Hostilities, the Burdens of War and the Consequences of Defeat. The second campaign. The British problem in European context. The crisis in the counties. The propaganda war. Anti-popish hysteria and popular politics. Another parliament? --
XVII. Epilogue: The Personal Rule and the English Civil War
Responsabilità: Kevin Sharpe.
Maggiori informazioni:

Abstract:

"In 1625 Charles I succeeded to the throne of a nation heavily involved in a European war and deeply divided by religious controversy. Within four years he had dissolved Parliament and begun a period of eleven years of personal rule. In the first, monumental and massively researched history of the King's personal rule, Kevin Sharpe has written a work of unprecedented importance in the debate on the origins of the English Civil War." "Whig historians have maintained that civil war was the inevitable outcome of a contest for power between King and Parliament. Revisionists have emphasized the basic harmony between King, Lords and Commons. Most scholars have agreed that it was the aristocratic temperament of Charles I, his adoption of 'new politics' and promotion of suspect religious policies, that eroded trust in the monarchy and fuelled a conflict that could have been avoided." "All such judgements rest on preconceptions which no biography has satisfactorily elucidated, and no history has thoroughly examined. Kevin Sharpe presents a wholly fresh picture of a dominant Charles I, of his personality, principles and policies. He explains why a king who, after summoning more parliaments in his first years of rule than his predecessors had for a century, determined to govern without them. He assesses Charles's programme of reform in central and local government, provides the first substantial analysis of Caroline religious policies, and explores the circumstances abroad and foreign objectives that shaped domestic politics. He subtly evaluates the degree of co-operation and opposition elicited and provoked by personal rule, and analyses the Scottish rebellion of 1637 that occasioned its undoing.".

"Deploying a breathtaking array of sources and written in an accessible and vigorous prose style, the book yields rich new insights into the history of the reign, of politics and religion, foreign policy and finance, of the court and the counties, of attitudes and ideas. It provides a substantial re-evaluation of the character of the King, of the importance of parliaments and the process of government without them. It represents a critical new perspective on the origins of the political struggle that ended on the battlefields of the English Civil War."--BOOK JACKET.

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