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Personality in its teens

Author: William Ryland Boorman
Publisher: New York : Macmillan Co., 1931.
Series: PsychBooks Collection
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"In 1880 the high school population of this country consisted of only 110,000 boys and girls. By 1900 this number had increased to 519,000; in 1920 to 2,199,000; and at the close of 1927 probably to 4,000,000. In addition, the private secondary school enrollment in 1927 must have been considerably in excess of a quarter of a million. That is to say, almost one-half of the nation's population of teen age were  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Boorman, William Ryland, 1891-
Personality in its teens.
New York, Macmillan Co., 1931
(DLC) 31002649
(OCoLC)2802759
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: William Ryland Boorman
OCLC Number: 568747414
Description: 1 online resource (xv, 268 pages .).
Contents: Part I. Introduction --
part II. His human relationships --
part III. Significant life situations --
part IV. His life principles --
part V. Some conclusions.
Series Title: PsychBooks Collection
Responsibility: by W. Ryland Boorman.

Abstract:

"In 1880 the high school population of this country consisted of only 110,000 boys and girls. By 1900 this number had increased to 519,000; in 1920 to 2,199,000; and at the close of 1927 probably to 4,000,000. In addition, the private secondary school enrollment in 1927 must have been considerably in excess of a quarter of a million. That is to say, almost one-half of the nation's population of teen age were attending high school institutions in 1927. In many respects the high school group represents the most important investment made by any community. The advantages which these boys and girls receive involve considerable personal sacrifice for many parents, and lay a heavy burden on the taxpayers. This group of young people will determine the nature of community and national life in this Western hemisphere during the years to come, because of the superior fitness for leadership conferred upon it by a high school training. They have been called "the hope of the world." There are distinctive features connected with a boy's high school life which need to be studied more carefully, if teachers, parents, and social workers are to understand his personality correctly. It is not alone the magic word "education" which accounts for the value of a high school career; it is rather a number of factors--family, religious, leadership, athletic, social, vocational, etc.--which go into the re-making of the boy's childish personality. It is for the purpose of lending a hand at this interesting, but intricate business, that the church, the Young Men's Christian Association, the Boy Scouts and similar organizations arrange their programs and attempt to bring their influence to bear. The idea of instituting the present detailed inquiry, with the object of discovering the facts responsible for the unique contribution which the Hi-Y Club makes to the enrichment of the personality of its members, originated in a few striking letters from high school boys themselves. As a result, the method of extended correspondence with a group of these individuals as a source of data for personality studies was given an extensive test. The Hi-Y movement is part of the Christian Citizenship movement among teen age boys. Its object is to "create, maintain and extend throughout the school and community, high standards of Christian character." While these group clubs of high school boys may put on athletic and social programs at times, the main purpose is devotional training and character formation. The boys who are leaders in this work are assembled in state camps and conferences periodically for special training and to fit them to exercise this leadership in the school more effectively. About three hundred different high school boys participated in this experiment voluntarily, and of course with varying degrees of enthusiasm"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

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