skip to content
Peter Handke Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Peter Handke

Author: Richard Arthur Firda
Publisher: New York : Twayne Publishers ; Toronto : Maxwell Macmillan Canada ; New York : Maxwell Macmillan International, ©1993.
Series: Twayne's world authors series, TWAS 828.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Peter Handke is probably the most versatile and controversial of the postwar generation of German-speaking writers. His status as Austria's most renowned living author - a dubious honor, in his opinion - owes as much to his artistic range (plays, novels, a memoir, film scripts, radio plays, poems, and essays) as it does to his reputation for flouting literary and theatrical convention. Handke was only 24 when, in
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy online

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Firda, Richard Arthur, 1931-
Peter Handke.
New York : Twayne Publishers ; Toronto : Maxwell Macmillan Canada ; New York : Maxwell Macmillan International, ©1993
(OCoLC)756420668
Named Person: Peter Handke; Peter Handke; Peter Handke
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Richard Arthur Firda
ISBN: 0805782818 9780805782813
OCLC Number: 26976824
Description: xv, 170 pages ; 23 cm.
Contents: Ch. 1. Origins of a Working-class Writer --
Ch. 2. Theatrical Experiments --
Ch. 3. A Writer's Apprenticeship --
Ch. 4. Mature Fiction --
Ch. 5. Recent Developments: A Tetralogy --
Ch. 6. New Prose: Meditative Fiction.
Series Title: Twayne's world authors series, TWAS 828.
Responsibility: Richard Arthur Firda.

Abstract:

"Peter Handke is probably the most versatile and controversial of the postwar generation of German-speaking writers. His status as Austria's most renowned living author - a dubious honor, in his opinion - owes as much to his artistic range (plays, novels, a memoir, film scripts, radio plays, poems, and essays) as it does to his reputation for flouting literary and theatrical convention. Handke was only 24 when, in 1966, he challenged the strategic direction of the Gruppe 47 - by then an "establishment" coalition, of German-speaking writers and artists - and later that year assaulted what he considered the "lies" of the theater in Publikumsbeschimpfung (Offending the Audience), rejecting the 1960s' theatrical norms of illusion, subjectivity, and political indoctrination. In his works of the intervening 27 years Handke has sought to show how visual perception, verbal expression, and memory can distort reality." "In this comprehensive assessment of Handke's writing, Richard Arthur Firda attributes the author's international readership (many of Handke's books were translated into English before he turned 40) to his career-long flair for publicity, a talent for sensing the future direction of not only the marketplace but also the avant-garde. Firda maintains that such works as Handke's phenomenally successful Die Angst des Tormanns beim Elfmeter (1972; The Goalie's Anxiety at the Penalty Kick) have linked him intimately with the European postmodern aesthetic, with the cutting edge of literary experimentation."

"Although the failure of language as valid communication is a theme common to all Handke's work, Firda argues that Handke in fact uses language as a precision tool - so much so that language would seem the only discernible "hero" of his explorations. In Kaspar (1968), for instance - perhaps Handke's best-known play - a mute is successfully subjected to "speech torture", but his mastery of words does not guarantee lasting control over the objects words signify, and in the end the conventions of language succumb to chaos." "Firda sees Handke's 1966 refutation of the Gruppe 47 as a watershed event in the shaping of postwar European literature. Whereas the Gruppe 47 sought to renew German language and literature on moral and ethical issues and staunchly defended German literature as a means for social regeneration, Handke found inspiration in the likes of French prose theoretician Alain Robbe-Grillet and theater of the absurd dramatists Eugene Ionesco and Samuel Beckett. According to Firda, Handke admits feeling the need to find "another country," another Austria, and he expects to find this country in "language," as revealed in the process of writing." "Having lived abroad in Frankfurt, Dusseldorf, Berlin, and Paris for many years, Handke seems more a writer of modern Europe than of his native Austria. This introduction to the writings of such a complex writer should prove essential reading to students interested in the literature of the new Europe."--Jacket.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/26976824>
library:oclcnum"26976824"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdf:typeschema:MediaObject
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:copyrightYear"1993"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1993"
schema:description""Although the failure of language as valid communication is a theme common to all Handke's work, Firda argues that Handke in fact uses language as a precision tool - so much so that language would seem the only discernible "hero" of his explorations. In Kaspar (1968), for instance - perhaps Handke's best-known play - a mute is successfully subjected to "speech torture", but his mastery of words does not guarantee lasting control over the objects words signify, and in the end the conventions of language succumb to chaos." "Firda sees Handke's 1966 refutation of the Gruppe 47 as a watershed event in the shaping of postwar European literature. Whereas the Gruppe 47 sought to renew German language and literature on moral and ethical issues and staunchly defended German literature as a means for social regeneration, Handke found inspiration in the likes of French prose theoretician Alain Robbe-Grillet and theater of the absurd dramatists Eugene Ionesco and Samuel Beckett. According to Firda, Handke admits feeling the need to find "another country," another Austria, and he expects to find this country in "language," as revealed in the process of writing." "Having lived abroad in Frankfurt, Dusseldorf, Berlin, and Paris for many years, Handke seems more a writer of modern Europe than of his native Austria. This introduction to the writings of such a complex writer should prove essential reading to students interested in the literature of the new Europe."--Jacket."@en
schema:description"Ch. 1. Origins of a Working-class Writer -- Ch. 2. Theatrical Experiments -- Ch. 3. A Writer's Apprenticeship -- Ch. 4. Mature Fiction -- Ch. 5. Recent Developments: A Tetralogy -- Ch. 6. New Prose: Meditative Fiction."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/17670718>
schema:genre"Criticism, interpretation, etc."@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:isPartOf
schema:name"Peter Handke"@en
schema:publication
<http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/26976824#PublicationEvent/new_york_twayne_publishers_toronto_maxwell_macmillan_canada_new_york_maxwell_macmillan_international_1993>
rdf:typeschema:PublicationEvent
schema:location
schema:location
schema:organizer
schema:organizer
schema:organizer
schema:publisher
schema:publisher
schema:publisher
schema:reviews
rdf:typeschema:Review
schema:itemReviewed<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/26976824>
schema:reviewBody""Peter Handke is probably the most versatile and controversial of the postwar generation of German-speaking writers. His status as Austria's most renowned living author - a dubious honor, in his opinion - owes as much to his artistic range (plays, novels, a memoir, film scripts, radio plays, poems, and essays) as it does to his reputation for flouting literary and theatrical convention. Handke was only 24 when, in 1966, he challenged the strategic direction of the Gruppe 47 - by then an "establishment" coalition, of German-speaking writers and artists - and later that year assaulted what he considered the "lies" of the theater in Publikumsbeschimpfung (Offending the Audience), rejecting the 1960s' theatrical norms of illusion, subjectivity, and political indoctrination. In his works of the intervening 27 years Handke has sought to show how visual perception, verbal expression, and memory can distort reality." "In this comprehensive assessment of Handke's writing, Richard Arthur Firda attributes the author's international readership (many of Handke's books were translated into English before he turned 40) to his career-long flair for publicity, a talent for sensing the future direction of not only the marketplace but also the avant-garde. Firda maintains that such works as Handke's phenomenally successful Die Angst des Tormanns beim Elfmeter (1972; The Goalie's Anxiety at the Penalty Kick) have linked him intimately with the European postmodern aesthetic, with the cutting edge of literary experimentation.""
schema:workExample
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.