skip to content
Philip Larkin : the poet's plight Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Philip Larkin : the poet's plight

Author: James Booth
Publisher: Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2005.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"James Booth reads Philip Larkin's mature poetry in terms of his ambiguous self-image as lonely, anti-social outsider, plighted to his art, and as nine-to-five librarian, sharing the common plight of humanity. Larkin is a poet of inexpressible transcendence, but also of afternoons in the park, housing estates, ambulances, and the toad work. Whether discussing Larkin's poems of love and intimacy or uncovering his  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Named Person: Philip Larkin
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: James Booth
ISBN: 1403918341 9781403918345
OCLC Number: 57694995
Description: ix, 230 p. ; 23 cm.
Contents: The poet's plight --
The delight of poetry --
Idiolect --
Form and genre --
Oeuvre --
Poetry as a living --
Professing poetry --
Librarian-poet --
Money --
Loves and muses I --
Life into art --
'Your mum' --
The broken engagement --
Flirtation --
An affair --
Loves and muses II --
'My wife' --
The long courtship --
A late fling --
Poetic histories --
Time and history --
Distances --
'The movement' --
Dates --
Politics --
Place and nation --
Living rooms --
Metaphor --
Rooms --
Parlour and attic --
Home --
Travelling coincidence --
Death's waiting-room --
Empty gestures --
Larkin as elegist --
The elegiac --
Memento mori --
Orpheus and Pan --
Metaphor in extremis --
Self-elegy --
Last words.
Responsibility: by James Booth.
More information:

Abstract:

"James Booth reads Philip Larkin's mature poetry in terms of his ambiguous self-image as lonely, anti-social outsider, plighted to his art, and as nine-to-five librarian, sharing the common plight of humanity. Larkin is a poet of inexpressible transcendence, but also of afternoons in the park, housing estates, ambulances, and the toad work. Whether discussing Larkin's poems of love and intimacy or uncovering his hidden metaphorical structures, Booth's focus is always on Larkin's artistry with words, the 'verbal devices' through which this purest of lyric poets celebrates 'the experience, the beauty'. Booth's close readings succeed in opening out wide theoretical perspectives on the relationship between art and biography, the nature of metaphor, and the different modes of elegy."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/57694995>
library:oclcnum"57694995"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/57694995>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2005"
schema:description"The poet's plight -- The delight of poetry -- Idiolect -- Form and genre -- Oeuvre -- Poetry as a living -- Professing poetry -- Librarian-poet -- Money -- Loves and muses I -- Life into art -- 'Your mum' -- The broken engagement -- Flirtation -- An affair -- Loves and muses II -- 'My wife' -- The long courtship -- A late fling -- Poetic histories -- Time and history -- Distances -- 'The movement' -- Dates -- Politics -- Place and nation -- Living rooms -- Metaphor -- Rooms -- Parlour and attic -- Home -- Travelling coincidence -- Death's waiting-room -- Empty gestures -- Larkin as elegist -- The elegiac -- Memento mori -- Orpheus and Pan -- Metaphor in extremis -- Self-elegy -- Last words."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/2479>
schema:genre"Criticism, interpretation, etc."@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Philip Larkin : the poet's plight"@en
schema:numberOfPages"230"
schema:publisher
schema:reviews
rdf:typeschema:Review
schema:itemReviewed<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/57694995>
schema:reviewBody""James Booth reads Philip Larkin's mature poetry in terms of his ambiguous self-image as lonely, anti-social outsider, plighted to his art, and as nine-to-five librarian, sharing the common plight of humanity. Larkin is a poet of inexpressible transcendence, but also of afternoons in the park, housing estates, ambulances, and the toad work. Whether discussing Larkin's poems of love and intimacy or uncovering his hidden metaphorical structures, Booth's focus is always on Larkin's artistry with words, the 'verbal devices' through which this purest of lyric poets celebrates 'the experience, the beauty'. Booth's close readings succeed in opening out wide theoretical perspectives on the relationship between art and biography, the nature of metaphor, and the different modes of elegy."--BOOK JACKET."
schema:url
schema:workExample
umbel:isLike<http://bnb.data.bl.uk/id/resource/GBA511573>

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.