skip to content
Philip Pullman's His dark materials--a multiple allegory : attacking religious superstition in The lion, the witch, and the wardrobe and Paradise lost Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Philip Pullman's His dark materials--a multiple allegory : attacking religious superstition in The lion, the witch, and the wardrobe and Paradise lost

Author: Leonard F Wheat
Publisher: Amherst, N.Y. : Prometheus Books, 2008.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Wheat demonstrates how Pullman retells two prominent works of British literature--C. S. Lewis's The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe and John Milton's Paradise Lost. Pullman's aim is to counter Lewis's pro-Christian allegory with his own anti-Christian allegory. Pullman does this in his second allegory by turning Paradise Lost upside down. Satan and his daughter, Sin, along with Adam's murderous son Cain, become  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Wheat, Leonard F., 1931-
Philip Pullman's His dark materials--a multiple allegory.
Amherst, N.Y. : Prometheus Books, 2008
(OCoLC)608419368
Named Person: Philip Pullman; Clive S Lewis; John Milton
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Leonard F Wheat
ISBN: 9781591025894 1591025893
OCLC Number: 152580912
Description: 338 p. ; 23 cm.
Contents: Pullman's surface story --
The lion, the witch and the wardrobe: C.S. Lewis's story and his allegory --
The lion, the witch and the wardrobe retold: Pullman's allegory --
Paradise lost retold: the hidden story and its themes --
Paradise lost retold: setting, characters, and events --
Missionaries, Darwin and conclusions.
Responsibility: Leonard F. Wheat.
More information:

Abstract:

Wheat demonstrates how Pullman retells two prominent works of British literature--C. S. Lewis's The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe and John Milton's Paradise Lost. Pullman's aim is to counter Lewis's pro-Christian allegory with his own anti-Christian allegory. Pullman does this in his second allegory by turning Paradise Lost upside down. Satan and his daughter, Sin, along with Adam's murderous son Cain, become heroes; God and Jesus become villains. This retold story depicts our society's warfare between knowledge (symbolized by Dust) and religious superstitions (symbolized by Specters). Pullman adds an original third hidden story featuring Christian missionaries, Charles Darwin, agnostics, and atheists. Wheat's intriguing interpretation of Pullman's work is the first to point out the many allegorical features of His Dark Materials and to highlight the ingenious ways in which Pullman subtly attacks religious institutions and superstitions.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/152580912>
library:oclcnum"152580912"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/152580912>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh2008124364>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Young adult fiction, English--History and criticism."@en
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2008"
schema:description"Pullman's surface story -- The lion, the witch and the wardrobe: C.S. Lewis's story and his allegory -- The lion, the witch and the wardrobe retold: Pullman's allegory -- Paradise lost retold: the hidden story and its themes -- Paradise lost retold: setting, characters, and events -- Missionaries, Darwin and conclusions."@en
schema:description"Wheat demonstrates how Pullman retells two prominent works of British literature--C. S. Lewis's The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe and John Milton's Paradise Lost. Pullman's aim is to counter Lewis's pro-Christian allegory with his own anti-Christian allegory. Pullman does this in his second allegory by turning Paradise Lost upside down. Satan and his daughter, Sin, along with Adam's murderous son Cain, become heroes; God and Jesus become villains. This retold story depicts our society's warfare between knowledge (symbolized by Dust) and religious superstitions (symbolized by Specters). Pullman adds an original third hidden story featuring Christian missionaries, Charles Darwin, agnostics, and atheists. Wheat's intriguing interpretation of Pullman's work is the first to point out the many allegorical features of His Dark Materials and to highlight the ingenious ways in which Pullman subtly attacks religious institutions and superstitions."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/320937401>
schema:genre"Criticism, interpretation, etc."@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Philip Pullman's His dark materials--a multiple allegory : attacking religious superstition in The lion, the witch, and the wardrobe and Paradise lost"@en
schema:numberOfPages"338"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.