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Philip Roth and the Jews

Author: Alan Cooper
Publisher: Albany : State University of New York Press, ©1996.
Series: SUNY series in modern Jewish literature and culture.
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In a style richly accessible to the general reader, this book presents Roth's secular Jewishness, with its own mysteries and humor, as most representative of the American Jewish experience. Thirty years into his career as a writer, Philip Roth remains known to most readers as a self-hating Jew or a flawed would be comic. Philip Roth and the Jews shows Roth the ironist, the master of absurdity, for whom  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Named Person: Philip Roth; Philip Roth; Philip Roth; Philip Roth; Philip Roth; Philip Roth; Philip Roth; Philip Roth; Philip Roth; Philip Roth; Philip Roth
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Alan Cooper
ISBN: 0791429091 9780791429099 0791429105 9780791429105
OCLC Number: 32548387
Description: xiv, 319 pages ; 24 cm.
Contents: 1. The Ironic and the Irate --
2. Starting Out --
3. Biography versus the Biographical --
4. Duty before Rage --
5. The Alex Perplex --
6. Absurdities: Post-Portnoy Seventies --
7. The Most Offensive Piece Roth Ever Wrote --
8. Watershed --
9. Zuckerman Bound --
10. Zuckerroth --
11. Operation Shylock --
12. Master Baiter: Sabbath's Theater --
13. Irony Board.
Series Title: SUNY series in modern Jewish literature and culture.
Responsibility: Alan Cooper.

Abstract:

In a style richly accessible to the general reader, this book presents Roth's secular Jewishness, with its own mysteries and humor, as most representative of the American Jewish experience. Thirty years into his career as a writer, Philip Roth remains known to most readers as a self-hating Jew or a flawed would be comic. Philip Roth and the Jews shows Roth the ironist, the master of absurdity, for whom twentieth-century America and modern Jewish history resonate with each other's signal accomplishments and anxieties. Roth's "egoism" is a persona, an abashed moralist discomfited by the world. Cooper shows that in the "Jewish" works Roth has taken the pulse of America and read the pressures of the world. Modernism, the universal tug for individual sovereignty and against tribal definition, is an issue everywhere. Roth's own odyssey of betrayal, loss, and return - the pattern of the Jewish writer in the last 200 years - is so shaped by his origins that Roth has carried his home and neighborhood into the corners of the earth and thus never left them.

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Linked Data


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