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Philosophy and theory of artificial intelligence

Author: Vincent C Müller
Publisher: Berlin ; New York : Springer, ©2013.
Series: Studies in applied philosophy, epistemology and rational ethics, 5.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Can we make machines that think and act like humans or other natural intelligent agents? The answer to this question depends on how we see ourselves and how we see the machines in question. Classical AI and cognitive science had claimed that cognition is computation, and can thus be reproduced on other computing machines, possibly surpassing the abilities of human intelligence. This consensus has now come under  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Vincent C Müller
ISBN: 9783642316746 3642316743 3642316735 9783642316739
OCLC Number: 809202195
Description: 1 online resource.
Contents: Machine Mentality? / Istvan S. N. Berkeley and Claiborne Rice --
'Quantum Linguistics' and Searle's Chinese Room Argument / John Mark Bishop, Slawomir J. Nasuto and Bob Coecke --
The Physics and Metaphysics of Computation and Cognition / Peter Bokulich --
The Two (Computational) Faces of AI / David Davenport --
The Info-computational Nature of Morphological Computing / Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic --
Limits of Computational Explanation of Cognition / Marcin Miłkowski --
Of (Zombie) Mice and Animats / Slawomir J. Nasuto and John Mark Bishop --
Generative Artificial Intelligence / Tijn van der Zant, Matthijs Kouw and Lambert Schomaker --
Turing Revisited: A Cognitively-Inspired Decomposition / Tarek Richard Besold --
The New Experimental Science of Physical Cognitive Systems / AI, Robotics, Neuroscience and Cognitive Sciences under a New Name with the Old Philosophical Problems? / Fabio Bonsignorio --
Toward a Modern Geography of Minds, Machines, and Math / Selmer Bringsjord and Naveen Sundar Govindarajulu --
Practical Introspection as Inspiration for AI / Sam Freed --
Computational Ontology and Deontology / Raffaela Giovagnoli --
Emotional Control-Conditio Sine Qua Non for Advanced Artificial Intelligences? / Claudius Gros --
Becoming Digital: Reconciling Theories of Digital Representation and Embodiment / Harry Halpin --
A Pre-neural Goal for Artificial Intelligence / Micha Hersch --
Intentional State-Ascription in Multi-Agent Systems / A Case Study in Unmanned Underwater Vehicles / Justin Horn, Nicodemus Hallin, Hossein Taheri, Michael O'Rourke and Dean Edwards --
Snapshots of Sensorimotor Perception: Putting the Body Back into Embodiment / Anthony F. Morse --
Feasibility of Whole Brain Emulation / Anders Sandberg --
C.S. Peirce and Artificial Intelligence: Historical Heritage and (New) Theoretical Stakes / Pierre Steiner --
Artificial Intelligence and the Body: Dreyfus, Bickhard, and the Future of AI / Daniel Susser --
Introducing Experion as a Primal Cognitive Unit of Neural Processing / Oscar Vilarroya --
The Frame Problem / Autonomy Approach versus Designer Approach / Aziz F. Zambak --
Machine Intentionality, the Moral Status of Machines, and the Composition Problem / David Leech Anderson --
Risks and Mitigation Strategies for Oracle AI / Stuart Armstrong --
The Past, Present, and Future Encounters between Computation and the Humanities / Stefano Franchi --
Being-in-the-AmI: Pervasive Computing from Phenomenological Perspective / Gagan Deep Kaur --
The Influence of Engineering Theory and Practice on Philosophy of AI / Viola Schiaffonati and Mario Verdicchio --
Artificial Intelligence Safety Engineering: Why Machine Ethics Is a Wrong Approach / Roman V. Yampolskiy --
What to Do with the Singularity Paradox?
Series Title: Studies in applied philosophy, epistemology and rational ethics, 5.
Responsibility: Vincent C. Müller (ed.).
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Abstract:

As the concept of the 'brain as computer' (and thus our ability to mimic it technologically) becomes more problematic, artificial intelligence needs redefining, a task this volume supports from  Read more...

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From the reviews: "This book comprises a very broad and interesting collection of extended versions of papers from the 2011 conference on Philosophy and Theory of Artificial Intelligence. ... this Read more...

 
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