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Philosophy as fiction : self, deception, and knowledge in Proust

Author: Joshua Landy
Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2004.
Edition/Format:   book_printbook : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Philosophy as Fiction seeks to account for the peculiar power of philosophical literature by taking as its case study the paradigmatic generic hybrid of the twentieth century, Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time. At once philosophical - in that it presents claims, and even deploys arguments concerning such traditionally philosophical issues as knowledge, self-deception, selfhood, love, friendship, and art - and  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Landy, Joshua, 1965-
Philosophy as fiction.
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2004
(OCoLC)607445969
Named Person: Marcel Proust; Marcel Proust; Marcel Proust; Marcel Proust
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Joshua Landy
ISBN: 0195169395 9780195169393 9780195389357 0195389352
OCLC Number: 52838943
Description: x, 255 pages ; 25 cm
Contents: Introduction : philosophy and fiction (nobody's Madeleine) --
Perspective (Marcel's steeples) --
Self-deception (Albertine's kimono) --
Self-creation (Odette's face) --
Coda : style (Proust's sentences).
Responsibility: Joshua Landy.
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Abstract:

Reconstructs Proust's outlook on knowledge, self-deception, and self-fashioning. This book explains why these ideas had to give rise to a work of art and not a philosophical treatise. It aims to help  Read more...

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"Landy's book delivers what has gone long and scandalously missing: a philosophical analysis of Proust's incomparable book that is muscular, concise, philosophically informed and sophisticated... The Read more...

 
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schema:reviewBody""Philosophy as Fiction seeks to account for the peculiar power of philosophical literature by taking as its case study the paradigmatic generic hybrid of the twentieth century, Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time. At once philosophical - in that it presents claims, and even deploys arguments concerning such traditionally philosophical issues as knowledge, self-deception, selfhood, love, friendship, and art - and literary - in that its situations are imaginary and its stylization inescapably prominent - Proust's novel presents us with a conundrum. How should it be read? Can the two discursive structures coexist, or must philosophy inevitably undermine literature (by sapping the narrative of its vitality) and literature undermine philosophy (by placing its claims in the mouth of an often unreliable narrator)?" "Unlike the essay Proust might have written, his novel grants us the opportunity to use it as a practice ground for cooperation among our faculties, for the careful sifting of memories, for the complex procedures involved in self-fashioning, and for the related art of self-deception. It is only because the narrator's insights do not always add up - a weakness, so long as one treats the novel as a straightforward treatise - that it can produce its training effect, a feature that turns out to be its ultimate strength."--Jacket."
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