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Philosophy in the mass age

Author: George Parkin Grant; William Christian
Publisher: Toronto [Ont.] : University of Toronto Press, ©1995.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
When George Grant delivered Philosophy in the Mass Age over the CBC radio network early in 1958, it was an immediate hit. He criticized the Western notion of progress and affirmed the role of philosophy in teaching and assisting people in understanding. Robert Fulford described it then as stunningly effective: 'Grant's talks, obviously the product of a supple and curious mind, were models of their type - learned but  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
History
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Grant, George Parkin, 1918-1988.
Philosophy in the mass age.
Toronto [Ont.] : University of Toronto Press, ©1995
(DLC) 95202671
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: George Parkin Grant; William Christian
ISBN: 9781442678453 1442678453
OCLC Number: 288145504
Notes: Revision of 8 lectures originally broadcast in Jan.-Feb. 1958 in the radio series CBC University of the air and transcription of Grant's answers to questions in a 9th program, Mar. 10, 1958.
Reprint of main texts originally published in 1959 & 1966 by Copp Clark, Toronto.
Description: 1 online resource (xxxi, 128 pages)
Responsibility: George Grant ; edited with an introduction by William Christian.
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Abstract:

When George Grant delivered Philosophy in the Mass Age over the CBC radio network early in 1958, it was an immediate hit. He criticized the Western notion of progress and affirmed the role of philosophy in teaching and assisting people in understanding. Robert Fulford described it then as stunningly effective: 'Grant's talks, obviously the product of a supple and curious mind, were models of their type - learned but clear, original but persuasive, highly personal but intensely communicative.'Grant's analysis of lhe paradox of modernity is no less intriguing today. The need to reconcile freedom with the moral law 'of which we do not take the measure, but by which we are measured and defined' is still an issue in our times.William Christian has restored the text of the original 1959 edition. He has supplemented it with material from the broadcast version of the lectures, including a ninth lecture, not previously published, in which Grant responded to listeners' questions. The controversial introduction to the 1966 edition appears as an appendix.

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