skip to content
The philosophy of the inductive sciences, founded upon their history. Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The philosophy of the inductive sciences, founded upon their history.

Author: William Whewell
Publisher: New York, Johnson Reprint Corp., 1967 [©1966]
Series: Sources of science, no. 41.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: William Whewell
OCLC Number: 733264
Notes: "Inductive table of optics": fold. table inserted.
Description: 2 volumes 22 cm.
Contents: Volume 1. Book I. Of ideas in general. Introduction --
Of the fundamental antithesis of philosophy --
Of technical terms --
Of necessary truths --
Of experience --
Of the grounds of necessary truths --
Fundamental ideas are not derived from experience --
Of the philosophy of the sciences --
Book II. The philosophy of the pure sciences. Of the pure sciences --
Of the idea of space --
Of some peculiarities of the idea of space --
Of the definitions and axioms which relate to space --
Of some objections which have been made to the doctrines stated in the previous chapter --
Of the perception of space. Brown's Opinion. Bell's opinion. Reid's Idomenians --Of the idea of time --
Of some peculiarities in the idea of time --
Of the axioms which relate to number --
Of the perception of time and number --
Of mathematical reasoning --
Of the foundations on the higher mathematics --
Doctrine of motion --
Of the application of mathematics to the inductive sciences. Volume 1 (Cont'd.). Book III. The philosophy of the mechanical sciences. Of the mechanical sciences --
Of the idea of cause --
Modern opinions respecting the idea of cause. Hume's doctrine. Stewart and Brown. Kant. Relation of Kant and Brown. Of the axioms which relate to the idea of cause --
Of the origin of our conceptions of force and matter --
Of the establishment of the principles of statics --
Of the establishment of trhe principles of dynamics --
Of the paradox of universal propositions obtained from experience --
Of the establishment of the law of universal gravitation --
Of the general diffusion of clear mechanical ideas --
Book IV. The philosophy of the secondary mechanical sciences. Of the idea of a medium as commonly employed --
On peculiarities in the perception of the different senses --
Successive attempts at the scientific application of the idea of a medium --
Of the measure of secondary qualities --
Book V. Of the philosophy of the mechanico-chemical sciences. Attempts at the scientific applications of the idea of polarity --
Of the connexion of polarities --
Book VI. The Philosophy of Chemistry. Attempts to conceive elementary composition --
Establishment and development of the idea of chemical affinity --
Of the idea of substance --
Application of the idea of substance in chemistry --
The atomic theory. Ancient atomists. Francis Bacon. Modern Atomists. Boscovich's theory. Poisson's inference. Wollaston's argument --
Book VII. The philosophy of morphology, including crystallography. Explication of the idea of symmetry --
Application of the idea of symmetry to crystals --
Speculations founded upon the symmetry of crystals. Volume 1 (Cont'd.) Book VIII. Philosophy of the classificatory sciences. The idea of likeness as governing the use of common names --
The methods of natural history, as regulated by the idea of likeness --
Application of the natural history method to mineralogy. M. Necker's Regne Mineral --
Book IX. The philosophy of biology. Analogy of biology with other sciences --
Successive biological hypotheses --
Attempts to analyse the idea of life --
Attempts to form ideas of separate vital forces, and first, of assimilation and secretions --
Of the idea of final causes --
Book X. The philosophy of palaetiology. Of paleotological sciences in general. Of the three members of a paleetiological science --
Of the doctrine of catastrophes and the doctrine of uniformity --
Of the relation of tradition to palaetiology --
Of the conception of a first cause. Volume 2. [Book 1] Of two principal processes by which science is constructed --Of the explication of conceptions --
Of facts as the materials of science --Of the colligation of facts --Of certain characteristics of scientific induction --. Of the logic of induction --
Of laws of phenomena and of causes --Of art and science --Of the classification of sciences --
BOOK XII. Review of opinions on the nature of knowledge, and the method of seeking it. Introduction --
Plato --
Aristotle --
Later Greeks --
Romans --
Schoolmen of the Middle Ages --
Innovations of the middle ages. Raymond Lully. Roger Bacon --
Revival of Platonism. Hermolaus Barbarus, &c. Nicolaus Cusanus. Marsilius Ficinis. Franciscus Patricius. Picus, Aggrippa, &c. Paracelsus, Fludd, &c. --
Theoretical reformers of science. Bernadinus Telesius. Thomas Campanella. Andreas Caesalpinus. Giordano Bruno. Peter Ramus. Melancthon --
Practical reformers of science. Leonardo da Vinci. Copernicus. Fabricius. Maurolycus. Benedetti. Gilbert. Galileo. Kepler. Tycho --
Francis Bacon --
From Bacon to Newton. Harvey. Descartes. Gassendi. Actual Progress. Otto Guericke, &c. Hooke. Royal Society. Bacon's New Atalantis. Cowley --
Newton --
Locke and his French followers. Sensational school. Condillac &c. Helvetius --
Reaction against the sensational school. Price's review. Stewart defends Price. Archbishop Whately. Larmoniguiere. M. Cousin. M. Ampere. Kant's reform of philosophy --
Further advance of the sensational school. M. Auguste Comte. Volume 2 (Cont'd.). Book XIII. Of methods employed in the formation of science. Introduction --
Of methods of observation --
Of methods of acquiring clear scientific ideas, and first of intellectual education --
Of methods of acquiring clear scientific ideas --
Analysis of the process of induction --
General rules for the construction of the conception --
Special method of induction applicable to quantity--
Methods of induction depending on resemblance --
On the application of inductive truths --
Of the induction of causes.
Series Title: Sources of science, no. 41.
Responsibility: A facsim. of the 2d ed., London, 1847, with a new introd. by John Herivel.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Related Subjects:(4)

User lists with this item (1)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/733264>
library:oclcnum"733264"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/733264>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1967"
schema:description"Volume 2 (Cont'd.). Book XIII. Of methods employed in the formation of science. Introduction -- Of methods of observation -- Of methods of acquiring clear scientific ideas, and first of intellectual education -- Of methods of acquiring clear scientific ideas -- Analysis of the process of induction -- General rules for the construction of the conception -- Special method of induction applicable to quantity-- Methods of induction depending on resemblance -- On the application of inductive truths -- Of the induction of causes."@en
schema:description"Volume 2. [Book 1] Of two principal processes by which science is constructed --Of the explication of conceptions -- Of facts as the materials of science --Of the colligation of facts --Of certain characteristics of scientific induction --. Of the logic of induction -- Of laws of phenomena and of causes --Of art and science --Of the classification of sciences -- BOOK XII. Review of opinions on the nature of knowledge, and the method of seeking it. Introduction -- Plato -- Aristotle -- Later Greeks -- Romans -- Schoolmen of the Middle Ages -- Innovations of the middle ages. Raymond Lully. Roger Bacon -- Revival of Platonism. Hermolaus Barbarus, &c. Nicolaus Cusanus. Marsilius Ficinis. Franciscus Patricius. Picus, Aggrippa, &c. Paracelsus, Fludd, &c. -- Theoretical reformers of science. Bernadinus Telesius. Thomas Campanella. Andreas Caesalpinus. Giordano Bruno. Peter Ramus. Melancthon -- Practical reformers of science. Leonardo da Vinci. Copernicus. Fabricius. Maurolycus. Benedetti. Gilbert. Galileo. Kepler. Tycho -- Francis Bacon -- From Bacon to Newton. Harvey. Descartes. Gassendi. Actual Progress. Otto Guericke, &c. Hooke. Royal Society. Bacon's New Atalantis. Cowley -- Newton -- Locke and his French followers. Sensational school. Condillac &c. Helvetius -- Reaction against the sensational school. Price's review. Stewart defends Price. Archbishop Whately. Larmoniguiere. M. Cousin. M. Ampere. Kant's reform of philosophy -- Further advance of the sensational school. M. Auguste Comte."@en
schema:description"Volume 1. Book I. Of ideas in general. Introduction -- Of the fundamental antithesis of philosophy -- Of technical terms -- Of necessary truths -- Of experience -- Of the grounds of necessary truths -- Fundamental ideas are not derived from experience -- Of the philosophy of the sciences -- Book II. The philosophy of the pure sciences. Of the pure sciences -- Of the idea of space -- Of some peculiarities of the idea of space -- Of the definitions and axioms which relate to space -- Of some objections which have been made to the doctrines stated in the previous chapter -- Of the perception of space. Brown's Opinion. Bell's opinion. Reid's Idomenians --Of the idea of time -- Of some peculiarities in the idea of time -- Of the axioms which relate to number -- Of the perception of time and number -- Of mathematical reasoning -- Of the foundations on the higher mathematics -- Doctrine of motion -- Of the application of mathematics to the inductive sciences."@en
schema:description"Volume 1 (Cont'd.) Book VIII. Philosophy of the classificatory sciences. The idea of likeness as governing the use of common names -- The methods of natural history, as regulated by the idea of likeness -- Application of the natural history method to mineralogy. M. Necker's Regne Mineral -- Book IX. The philosophy of biology. Analogy of biology with other sciences -- Successive biological hypotheses -- Attempts to analyse the idea of life -- Attempts to form ideas of separate vital forces, and first, of assimilation and secretions -- Of the idea of final causes -- Book X. The philosophy of palaetiology. Of paleotological sciences in general. Of the three members of a paleetiological science -- Of the doctrine of catastrophes and the doctrine of uniformity -- Of the relation of tradition to palaetiology -- Of the conception of a first cause."@en
schema:description"Volume 1 (Cont'd.). Book III. The philosophy of the mechanical sciences. Of the mechanical sciences -- Of the idea of cause -- Modern opinions respecting the idea of cause. Hume's doctrine. Stewart and Brown. Kant. Relation of Kant and Brown. Of the axioms which relate to the idea of cause -- Of the origin of our conceptions of force and matter -- Of the establishment of the principles of statics -- Of the establishment of trhe principles of dynamics -- Of the paradox of universal propositions obtained from experience -- Of the establishment of the law of universal gravitation -- Of the general diffusion of clear mechanical ideas -- Book IV. The philosophy of the secondary mechanical sciences. Of the idea of a medium as commonly employed -- On peculiarities in the perception of the different senses -- Successive attempts at the scientific application of the idea of a medium -- Of the measure of secondary qualities -- Book V. Of the philosophy of the mechanico-chemical sciences. Attempts at the scientific applications of the idea of polarity -- Of the connexion of polarities -- Book VI. The Philosophy of Chemistry. Attempts to conceive elementary composition -- Establishment and development of the idea of chemical affinity -- Of the idea of substance -- Application of the idea of substance in chemistry -- The atomic theory. Ancient atomists. Francis Bacon. Modern Atomists. Boscovich's theory. Poisson's inference. Wollaston's argument -- Book VII. The philosophy of morphology, including crystallography. Explication of the idea of symmetry -- Application of the idea of symmetry to crystals -- Speculations founded upon the symmetry of crystals."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1475955>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The philosophy of the inductive sciences, founded upon their history."@en
schema:publisher
schema:url

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.