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The place of tolerance in Islam

Author: Khaled Abou El Fadl; Joshua Cohen; Ian Lague
Publisher: Boston : Beacon Press, ©2002.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Khaled Abou El Fadl, a prominent critic of Islamic puritanism, leads off this lively debate by arguing that Islam is a deeply tolerant religion. Injunctions to violence against nonbelievers stem from misreadings of the Qur'an, he claims, and even jihad, or so called holy war, has no basis in Qur'anic text or Muslim theology but instead grew out of social and political conflict." "Many of Abou El Fadl's respondents  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Khaled Abou El Fadl; Joshua Cohen; Ian Lague
ISBN: 0807002291 9780807002292
OCLC Number: 49902143
Description: ix, 117 p. ; 21 cm.
Contents: The place of tolerance in Islam / Khaled Abou El Fadl --
Puritanism and stagnation / Milton Viorst --
A conservative legacy / Sohail H. Hashmi --
Theological distractions / Tariq Ali --
The limits of tolerance / Abid Ullah Jan --
Text and context / Stanley Kurtz --
Beyond interpretation / Amina Wadud --
The importance of democracy / Akeel Bilgrami --
Intolerable injustices / Mashhood Rizvi --
Struggle in Islam / John L. Esposito --
Plural traditions / Qamar-ul Huda --
The quandary of leadership / R. Scott Appleby --
Reply / Khaled Abou El Fadl.
Other Titles: Boston review (Cambridge, Mass. : 1982)
Responsibility: Khaled Abou El Fadl ; edited by Joshua Cohen and Ian Lague for Boston review.
More information:

Abstract:

"Khaled Abou El Fadl, a prominent critic of Islamic puritanism, leads off this lively debate by arguing that Islam is a deeply tolerant religion. Injunctions to violence against nonbelievers stem from misreadings of the Qur'an, he claims, and even jihad, or so called holy war, has no basis in Qur'anic text or Muslim theology but instead grew out of social and political conflict." "Many of Abou El Fadl's respondents think differently. Some contend that his brand of Islam will only appeal to Westerners and students in "liberal divinity schools" and that serious religious dialogue in the Muslim world requires dramatic political reforms. Other respondents argue that theological debates are irrelevant and that our focus should be on Western sabotage of such reforms. Still others argue that calls for Islamic "tolerance" betray the Qur'anic injunction for Muslims to struggle against their oppressors."--BOOK JACKET.

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Linked Data


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schema:reviewBody""Khaled Abou El Fadl, a prominent critic of Islamic puritanism, leads off this lively debate by arguing that Islam is a deeply tolerant religion. Injunctions to violence against nonbelievers stem from misreadings of the Qur'an, he claims, and even jihad, or so called holy war, has no basis in Qur'anic text or Muslim theology but instead grew out of social and political conflict." "Many of Abou El Fadl's respondents think differently. Some contend that his brand of Islam will only appeal to Westerners and students in "liberal divinity schools" and that serious religious dialogue in the Muslim world requires dramatic political reforms. Other respondents argue that theological debates are irrelevant and that our focus should be on Western sabotage of such reforms. Still others argue that calls for Islamic "tolerance" betray the Qur'anic injunction for Muslims to struggle against their oppressors."--BOOK JACKET."
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