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Playing in the dark : whiteness and the literary imagination Titelvorschau
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Playing in the dark : whiteness and the literary imagination

Verfasser/in: Toni Morrison
Verlag: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1992.
Serien: William E. Massey, Sr. lectures in the history of American civilization.
Ausgabe/Format   Buch : EnglischAlle Ausgaben und Formate anzeigen
Datenbank:WorldCat
Zusammenfassung:
Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Toni Morrison brings the genius of a master writer to this personal inquiry into the significance of African-Americans in the American literary imagination. Her goal, she states at the outset, is to "put forth an argument for extending the study of American literature...draw a map, so to speak, of a critical geography and use that map to open as much space for discovery, intellectual  Weiterlesen…
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Gattung/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Dokumenttyp: Buch
Alle Autoren: Toni Morrison
ISBN: 0674673778 9780674673779
OCLC-Nummer: 24952905
Beschreibung: xiii, 91 p. ; 22 cm.
Inhalt: Black matters --
Romancing the shadow --
Disturbing nurses and the kindness of sharks.
Serientitel: William E. Massey, Sr. lectures in the history of American civilization.
Verfasserangabe: Toni Morrison.
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Abstract:

Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Toni Morrison brings the genius of a master writer to this personal inquiry into the significance of African-Americans in the American literary imagination. Her goal, she states at the outset, is to "put forth an argument for extending the study of American literature...draw a map, so to speak, of a critical geography and use that map to open as much space for discovery, intellectual adventure, and close exploration as did the original charting of the New World--without the mandate for conquest." Author of Beloved, The Bluest Eye, Song of Solomon, and other vivid portrayals of black American experience, Morrison ponders the effect that living in a historically racialized society has had on American writing in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. She argues that race has become a metaphor, a way of referring to forces, events, and forms of social decay, economic division, and human panic. Her compelling point is that the central characteristics of American literature--individualism, masculinity, the insistence upon innocence coupled to an obsession with figurations of death and hell--are responses to a dark and abiding Africanist presence. Through her investigation of black characters, narrative strategies, and idiom in the fiction of white American writers, Morrison provides a daring perspective that is sure to alter conventional notions about American literature. She considers Willa Cather and the impact of race on concept and plot; turns to Poe, Hawthorne, and Melville to examine the black force that figures so significantly in the literature of early America; and discusses the implications of the Africanist presence at the heart of Huckleberry Finn. A final chapter on Ernest Hemingway is a brilliant exposition of the racial subtext that glimmers beneath the surface plots of his fiction. Written with the artistic vision that has earned her a preeminent place in modern letters, Playing in the Dark will be avidly read by Morrison admirers as well as by students, critics, and scholars of American literature.

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