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Plotinus,

Author: Plotinus.; A H Armstrong; Paul Henry; Hans-Rudolf Schwyzer
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press; London, W. Heinemann, 1966-1988.
Series: Loeb classical library, 440-445.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
PLOTINUS (A.D. 204/5-270), possibly of Roman descent, but certainly a Greek in education and environment, was the first and greatest of Neoplatonic philosophers. Practically nothing is known of his early life, but at the age of 28 he came to Alexandria, and studied philosophy with Ammonius 'Saccas' for 11 years. Wishing to learn the philosophy of the Persians and Indians he joined the expedition of Gordian III  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Ouvrages avant 1800
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Plotinus.
Plotinus.
Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press; London, W. Heinemann, 1966-1988
(OCoLC)566201966
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Plotinus.; A H Armstrong; Paul Henry; Hans-Rudolf Schwyzer
ISBN: 0674994841 9780674994843 0674994868 9780674994867 0674994876 9780674994874 0674994884 9780674994881 043499443X 9780434994434 0674994892 9780674994898 0674994906 9780674994904 0434994456 9780434994458 0674995155 9780674995154
OCLC Number: 690682
Language Note: Greek and English.
Notes: Greek and English.
The Greek text is essentially that of P. Henry and H.R. Schwyzer.
Description: 7 volumes ; 17 cm.
Contents: 1. Porphyry on the life of Plotinus and the order of his books. Enneads I.--2. Enneads II.--3. Enneads III.--4. Enneads IV.--5. Enneads V.--6-7. Enneads VI.
Series Title: Loeb classical library, 440-445.
Other Titles: Enneads.
Responsibility: with an English translation by A.H. Armstrong.

Abstract:

PLOTINUS (A.D. 204/5-270), possibly of Roman descent, but certainly a Greek in education and environment, was the first and greatest of Neoplatonic philosophers. Practically nothing is known of his early life, but at the age of 28 he came to Alexandria, and studied philosophy with Ammonius 'Saccas' for 11 years. Wishing to learn the philosophy of the Persians and Indians he joined the expedition of Gordian III against the Persians in 243, not without subsequent danger. Aged 40 he came to Rome and taught philosophy there till shortly before his death. In 253 he began to write and continued to do so till the last year of his life. His writings were edited by his disciple Porphyry, who published them many years after his master's death in six sets of nine treatises each (the Enneads). He regarded Plato as his master, and his own philosophy is a profoundly original development of the Platonism of the first two centuries of the Christian era and the closely related thought of the Neophthagoreans, with some influences from Aristotle and his followers and the Stoics, whose writings he knew well but used critically. There is no real trace of Oriental influence on his thought, and he was passionately opposed to Gnosticism. He is a unique combination of mystic and Hellenic rationalist. He was deeply respected by many members of the Roman aristocracy and a personal friend of the Emperor Gallienus and his wife. He devoted much of his time to the care of orphan children to whom he had been appointed guardian. But before his death his circle of friends had broken up, and he died alone except for his faithful friend and doctor Eustochius. His thought dominated later Greek philosophy and influenced both Christians and Moslems, and is still alive today because of its union of rationality and intense religious experience.

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