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The poetic and dramatic works of Alfred, lord Tennyson

Autore: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson, Baron; W J Rolfe
Editore: Boston ; New York : Houghton Mifflin and Co., 1898.
Serie: Cambridge edition of the poets.
Edizione/Formato:   Libro : English : Cambridge edVedi tutte le edizioni e i formati
Banca dati:WorldCat
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Tennyson, Alfred Tennyson, Baron, 1809-1892.
Poetic and dramatic works of Alfred, lord Tennyson.
Boston ; New York : Houghton Mifflin and Co., 1898
(OCoLC)579028463
Persona incaricata: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson, Baron
Tipo documento: Book
Tutti gli autori / Collaboratori: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson, Baron; W J Rolfe
Numero OCLC: 363374
Note: Title vignette.
Descrizione: xvii, 887 p. : port. ; 21 cm.
Contenuti: Claribel --
Nothing will die --
All things will die --
Leonine elegiacs --
Supposed confessions of a second-rate sensitive mind --
The kraken --
Song: 'The winds, as at their hour of birth' --
Lilian --
Isabel --
Mariana --
To- --
Madeline --
Song: The owl --
Second song, to the same --
Recollections of the Arabian nights --
Ode to memory --
Song: 'A spirit haunts the year's last hours' --
A character --
The poet --
The poet's mind --
The sea-fairies --
The deserted house --
The dying swan --
A dirge --
Love and death --
The ballad of Oriana --
Circumstance --
The merman --
The mermaid --
Adeline --
Margaret --
Rosalind --
Eleanore --
Kate --
'My life is full of weary days' --
To J.M.K. --
'Mine be the strength of spirit, full and free' --
Alexander --
Buonaparte --
Poland --
'Caress'd or chidden by the slender hand' --
The form, the form alone is eloquent' --
'Wan sculptor, weepest thou to take the cast' --
'If I were loved, as I desire to be' --
The bridesmaid --
The lady of Shalott --
Mariana in the south --
The two voices --
The miller's daughter --
Fatima --
OEnone --
The sisters --
The palace of art --
Lady Clara vere de vere --
The may queen --
New-year's eve --
Conclusion --
The lotos-eaters --
Choric song --
A dream of fair women --
The blackbird --
The death of the old year --
To J.S. --
On a mourner --
'You ask me, why, tho' ill at ease' --
'Of old sat freedom on the heights' --
'Love thou thy land, with love far-brought' --
England and America in 1782 --
The goose --
The epic --
Morte d'arthur --
The gardener's daughter --
Dora --
Audley court --
Walking to the mail --
Edwin Morris --
Saint Simeon stylites --
The talking oak --
Love and duty --
The golden year --
Ulysses --
Tithonus --
Locksley hall --
Godiva --
The day-dream : Prologue ; The sleeping palace ; The sleeping beauty ; The arrival ; The revival ; The departure ; Moral ; L' envoi ; Epilogue --
Amphion --
Saint Agnes' eve --
Sir Galahad --
Edward Gray --
Will Waterproof's lyrical monologue --
Lady Clare --
The captain --
The Lord of Burleigh --
The voyage --
Sir Launcelot and Queen Guinevere --
A farewell --
The beggar maid --
The eagle --
'Move eastward, happy earth' --
'Come not, when I am dead' --
The letters --
The vision of sin --
To-, after reading a life and letters --
To E.L., on his travels in Greece --
'Break, break, break' --
The poet's song --
The princess --
In memoriam A.H.H. --
Maud; a monodrama --
The brook --
The daisy --
To the rev. F.D. Maurice --
Will --
Ode on the death of the duke of Wellington --
The charge of the light brigade --
Enoch Arden --
Aylmer's field --
Sea dreams --
Ode sung at the opening of the international exhibition --
A welcome to Alexandra --
The grandmother --
Northern farmer; old style --
Northern farmer; new style --
In the valley of Cauteretz --
The flower --
Requiescat --
The sailor boy --
The islet --
A dedication --
Boadicea --
On translations of Homer --
Milton --
'O you chorus of indolent reviewers' --
Specimen of a translation of the Iliad in blank verse --
The third of February, 1852 --
A welcome to her royal highness Marie Alexandrovna, Duchess of Edinburgh --
In the garden at Swainston --
The city child --
Minnie and Winnie --
The spiteful letter --
Literary squabbles --
The victim --
Wages --
The higher pantheism --
The voice and the peak --
'Flower in the crannied wall' --
Lucretius --
The window: On the hill ; At the window ; Gone ; Winter ; Spring ; The letter ; No answer ; The Answer ; Ay ; When ; Marriage morning --
The lover's tale --
The golden supper --
Dedication --
The coming of Arthur --
The round table --
Gareth and Lynette --
The marriage of Geraint --
Geraint and Enid --
Balin and Balin --
Merlin and Vivien --
Lancelot and Elaine --
The holy grail --
Pelleas and Ettarre --
The last tournament --
Guinevere --
The passing of Arthur --
To the queen --
To Alfred Tennyson, my grandson --
The first quarrel --
Rizpah --
The northern cobbler --
The revenge --
The sisters --
The village wife --
In the children's hospital --
Dedicatory poem to the princess Alice --
The defence of Lucknow --
Sir John Oldcastle, Lord Cobham --
Columbus --
The voyage of Maeldune --
De Profundis: The two greetings ; The human cry --
Prefatory sonnet --
To the rev. W.H. Brookfield --
Montenegro --
To victor Hugo --
Battle of Brunanburh --
Achilles over the trench --
To princess Frederica on her marriage --
Sir John Franklin --
To Dante --
To E. Fitzgerald --
Tiresias --
The wreck --
Despair --
The ancient sage --
The flight --
To-morrow --
The spinster's sweet-arts --
The charge of the heavy brigade at Balaclava: Prologue: to General Hamley ; The charge ; Epilogue --
To Virgil --
The dead prophet --
Early spring --
Prefatory poem to my brother's sonnets --
'Frater ave atque vale' --
Helen's tower --
Epitaph on Lord Stratford de Redcliffe --
Epitaph on General Gordon --
Epitaph on Caxton --
To the Duke of Argyll --
Hangs all round --
Freedom --
Poets and their bibliographies --
To H.R.H. Princess Beatrice --
Locksley Hall sixty years after --
The fleet --
Opening of the Indian and colonial exhibition by the queen --
To W.C. Macready --
To the Marquis of Dufferin and Ava --
On the jubilee of Queen Victoria --
To Professor Jebb --
Demeter and Persephone --
Owd Roa --
Vastness --
The ring --
Forlorn --
Happy --
To Ulysses --
To Mary Boyle --
The progress of spring --
Merlin and the gleam --
Romney's remorse --
Parnassus --
By an evolutionist --
Old age --
Far-far-away --
Politics --
Beautiful city --
The roses on the terrace --
The play --
On one who affected an effeminate manner --
To one who ran down the English --
The snowdrop --
The throstle --
The oak --
In memoriam W.G. Ward --
Queen Mary: a drama --
Harold: a drama: Show-day at Battle Abbey, 1876 ; Harold --
Becket --
The falcon --
The cup --
The promise of May --
Crossing the bar --
Selections from 'Poems by two brothers': Memory ; The exile's harp ; 'Why should we weep for those who die?' ; Remorse ; The dell of E- ; Antony to Cleopatra ; 'I wander in darkness and sorrow' ; The old sword ; 'We meet no more' ; Written by an exile of Bassorah ; The vale of bones ; 'Did not thy roseate lips out-vie ; Persia ; Egypt ; The druid's prophecies ; The expedition of Nadir Shah into Hindostan ; The maid of Savoy ; Midnight ; Scotch song ; Song: 'It is the solemn even-time' ; Friendship ; 'And ask ye why these sad tears stream?' ; On sublimity ; The deity ; Time: an ode ; God's denunciations against Pharaoh-Hophra, or Apries ; The grave of a suicide ; The walk at midnight ; Mithridrates presenting Berenice with the cup of poison ; The old chieftain ; The fall of Jerusalem ; Lamentation of the Peruvians ; 'The sun goes down in the dark blue main' ; On a dead enemy ; The duke of Alva's observation on kings ; 'Ah! yes, the lip may faintly smile' ; 'Thou camest to thy bower, my love, across the musky grove' ; The passions ; The high-priest to Alexander ; On the moon-light shining upon a friend's grave ; A contrast ; The dying Christian ; 'How gaily sinks the gorgeous sun within his golden bed' ; 'Oh! Ye wild winds, that roar and rave' ; Switzerland ; Babylon ; Love ; Song: 'To sit beside a chrystal spring' ; Exhortation to the Greeks ; King Charles's vision --Timbuctoo --
The 'how' and the 'why' --
The burial of love --
Song: 'I' the glooming light' --
Song: 'The lintwhite and the throstlecock' --
Song: 'Every day hath its night' --
Hero to Leander --
The mystic --
The grasshopper --
Love, pride, and forgetfulness --
Chorus --
Lost hope --
The tears of heaven --
Love and sorrow --
To a lady sleeping --
'Could I outwear my present state of woe' --
'Though night hath climbed her peak of highest noon' --
'Shall the hag evil die with child of good' --
'The pallid thunder-stricken sigh for gain' --
Love --
English war-song --
National song --
Dualisms --
The sea fairies --
'O beauty, passing beauty! sweetest sweet!' --
The Hesperides --
Rosalind --
Song: 'who can say' --
Sonnet, written on hearing of the outbreak of the Polish insurrection --
O darling room --
To Christopher North --
On Cambridge University --
No more --
Anacreontics --
A fragment --
'Me my own fate to lasting-sorrow doometh' --
'Check every out-flash, every ruder sally' --
'There are three things which fill my heart with sighs' --
The skipping-rope --
The new Timon and the poets --
Lines, contributed to 'The Manchester Athenaeum' --
Stanzas, contributed to 'The Keepsake' --
Britons, guard your own --
Additional verses to 'God save the Queen' --
The war --
The ringlet --
Lines: Long as the heart beats life within her breast --
1865-1866 --
Stanza, contributed to the 'Shakespearean show-book' --
Compromise --
Experiment in Sapphic metre.
Titolo della serie: Cambridge edition of the poets.
Altri titoli: Works.
Tennyson's poetical works
Responsabilità: [edited by W.J. Rolfe].

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schema:description"Claribel -- Nothing will die -- All things will die -- Leonine elegiacs -- Supposed confessions of a second-rate sensitive mind -- The kraken -- Song: 'The winds, as at their hour of birth' -- Lilian -- Isabel -- Mariana -- To- -- Madeline -- Song: The owl -- Second song, to the same -- Recollections of the Arabian nights -- Ode to memory -- Song: 'A spirit haunts the year's last hours' -- A character -- The poet -- The poet's mind -- The sea-fairies -- The deserted house -- The dying swan -- A dirge -- Love and death -- The ballad of Oriana -- Circumstance -- The merman -- The mermaid -- Adeline -- Margaret -- Rosalind -- Eleanore -- Kate -- 'My life is full of weary days' -- To J.M.K. -- 'Mine be the strength of spirit, full and free' -- Alexander -- Buonaparte -- Poland -- 'Caress'd or chidden by the slender hand' -- The form, the form alone is eloquent' -- 'Wan sculptor, weepest thou to take the cast' -- 'If I were loved, as I desire to be' -- The bridesmaid -- The lady of Shalott -- Mariana in the south -- The two voices -- The miller's daughter -- Fatima -- OEnone -- The sisters -- The palace of art -- Lady Clara vere de vere -- The may queen -- New-year's eve -- Conclusion -- The lotos-eaters -- Choric song -- A dream of fair women -- The blackbird -- The death of the old year -- To J.S. -- On a mourner -- 'You ask me, why, tho' ill at ease' -- 'Of old sat freedom on the heights' -- 'Love thou thy land, with love far-brought' -- England and America in 1782 -- The goose -- The epic -- Morte d'arthur -- The gardener's daughter -- Dora -- Audley court -- Walking to the mail -- Edwin Morris -- Saint Simeon stylites -- The talking oak -- Love and duty -- The golden year -- Ulysses -- Tithonus -- Locksley hall -- Godiva -- The day-dream : Prologue ; The sleeping palace ; The sleeping beauty ; The arrival ; The revival ; The departure ; Moral ; L' envoi ; Epilogue -- Amphion -- Saint Agnes' eve -- Sir Galahad -- Edward Gray -- Will Waterproof's lyrical monologue -- Lady Clare -- The captain -- The Lord of Burleigh -- The voyage -- Sir Launcelot and Queen Guinevere -- A farewell -- The beggar maid -- The eagle -- 'Move eastward, happy earth' -- 'Come not, when I am dead' -- The letters -- The vision of sin -- To-, after reading a life and letters -- To E.L., on his travels in Greece -- 'Break, break, break' -- The poet's song -- The princess -- In memoriam A.H.H. -- Maud; a monodrama -- The brook -- The daisy -- To the rev. F.D. Maurice -- Will -- Ode on the death of the duke of Wellington -- The charge of the light brigade -- Enoch Arden -- Aylmer's field -- Sea dreams -- Ode sung at the opening of the international exhibition -- A welcome to Alexandra -- The grandmother -- Northern farmer; old style -- Northern farmer; new style -- In the valley of Cauteretz -- The flower -- Requiescat -- The sailor boy -- The islet -- A dedication -- Boadicea -- On translations of Homer -- Milton -- 'O you chorus of indolent reviewers' -- Specimen of a translation of the Iliad in blank verse -- The third of February, 1852 -- A welcome to her royal highness Marie Alexandrovna, Duchess of Edinburgh -- In the garden at Swainston -- The city child -- Minnie and Winnie -- The spiteful letter -- Literary squabbles -- The victim -- Wages -- The higher pantheism -- The voice and the peak -- 'Flower in the crannied wall' -- Lucretius -- The window: On the hill ; At the window ; Gone ; Winter ; Spring ; The letter ; No answer ; The Answer ; Ay ; When ; Marriage morning -- The lover's tale -- The golden supper -- Dedication -- The coming of Arthur -- The round table -- Gareth and Lynette -- The marriage of Geraint -- Geraint and Enid -- Balin and Balin -- Merlin and Vivien -- Lancelot and Elaine -- The holy grail -- Pelleas and Ettarre -- The last tournament -- Guinevere -- The passing of Arthur -- To the queen -- To Alfred Tennyson, my grandson -- The first quarrel -- Rizpah -- The northern cobbler -- The revenge -- The sisters -- The village wife -- In the children's hospital -- Dedicatory poem to the princess Alice -- The defence of Lucknow -- Sir John Oldcastle, Lord Cobham -- Columbus -- The voyage of Maeldune -- De Profundis: The two greetings ; The human cry -- Prefatory sonnet -- To the rev. W.H. Brookfield -- Montenegro -- To victor Hugo -- Battle of Brunanburh -- Achilles over the trench -- To princess Frederica on her marriage -- Sir John Franklin -- To Dante -- To E. Fitzgerald -- Tiresias -- The wreck -- Despair -- The ancient sage -- The flight -- To-morrow -- The spinster's sweet-arts -- The charge of the heavy brigade at Balaclava: Prologue: to General Hamley ; The charge ; Epilogue -- To Virgil -- The dead prophet -- Early spring -- Prefatory poem to my brother's sonnets -- 'Frater ave atque vale' -- Helen's tower -- Epitaph on Lord Stratford de Redcliffe -- Epitaph on General Gordon -- Epitaph on Caxton -- To the Duke of Argyll -- Hangs all round -- Freedom -- Poets and their bibliographies -- To H.R.H. Princess Beatrice -- Locksley Hall sixty years after -- The fleet -- Opening of the Indian and colonial exhibition by the queen -- To W.C. Macready -- To the Marquis of Dufferin and Ava -- On the jubilee of Queen Victoria -- To Professor Jebb -- Demeter and Persephone -- Owd Roa -- Vastness -- The ring -- Forlorn -- Happy -- To Ulysses -- To Mary Boyle -- The progress of spring -- Merlin and the gleam -- Romney's remorse -- Parnassus -- By an evolutionist -- Old age -- Far-far-away -- Politics -- Beautiful city -- The roses on the terrace -- The play -- On one who affected an effeminate manner -- To one who ran down the English -- The snowdrop -- The throstle -- The oak -- In memoriam W.G. Ward -- Queen Mary: a drama -- Harold: a drama: Show-day at Battle Abbey, 1876 ; Harold -- Becket -- The falcon -- The cup -- The promise of May -- Crossing the bar -- Selections from 'Poems by two brothers': Memory ; The exile's harp ; 'Why should we weep for those who die?' ; Remorse ; The dell of E- ; Antony to Cleopatra ; 'I wander in darkness and sorrow' ; The old sword ; 'We meet no more' ; Written by an exile of Bassorah ; The vale of bones ; 'Did not thy roseate lips out-vie ; Persia ; Egypt ; The druid's prophecies ; The expedition of Nadir Shah into Hindostan ; The maid of Savoy ; Midnight ; Scotch song ; Song: 'It is the solemn even-time' ; Friendship ; 'And ask ye why these sad tears stream?' ; On sublimity ; The deity ; Time: an ode ; God's denunciations against Pharaoh-Hophra, or Apries ; The grave of a suicide ; The walk at midnight ; Mithridrates presenting Berenice with the cup of poison ; The old chieftain ; The fall of Jerusalem ; Lamentation of the Peruvians ; 'The sun goes down in the dark blue main' ; On a dead enemy ; The duke of Alva's observation on kings ; 'Ah! yes, the lip may faintly smile' ; 'Thou camest to thy bower, my love, across the musky grove' ; The passions ; The high-priest to Alexander ; On the moon-light shining upon a friend's grave ; A contrast ; The dying Christian ; 'How gaily sinks the gorgeous sun within his golden bed' ; 'Oh! Ye wild winds, that roar and rave' ; Switzerland ; Babylon ; Love ; Song: 'To sit beside a chrystal spring' ; Exhortation to the Greeks ; King Charles's vision --Timbuctoo -- The 'how' and the 'why' -- The burial of love -- Song: 'I' the glooming light' -- Song: 'The lintwhite and the throstlecock' -- Song: 'Every day hath its night' -- Hero to Leander -- The mystic -- The grasshopper -- Love, pride, and forgetfulness -- Chorus -- Lost hope -- The tears of heaven -- Love and sorrow -- To a lady sleeping -- 'Could I outwear my present state of woe' -- 'Though night hath climbed her peak of highest noon' -- 'Shall the hag evil die with child of good' -- 'The pallid thunder-stricken sigh for gain' -- Love -- English war-song -- National song -- Dualisms -- The sea fairies -- 'O beauty, passing beauty! sweetest sweet!' -- The Hesperides -- Rosalind -- Song: 'who can say' -- Sonnet, written on hearing of the outbreak of the Polish insurrection -- O darling room -- To Christopher North -- On Cambridge University -- No more -- Anacreontics -- A fragment -- 'Me my own fate to lasting-sorrow doometh' -- 'Check every out-flash, every ruder sally' -- 'There are three things which fill my heart with sighs' -- The skipping-rope -- The new Timon and the poets -- Lines, contributed to 'The Manchester Athenaeum' -- Stanzas, contributed to 'The Keepsake' -- Britons, guard your own -- Additional verses to 'God save the Queen' -- The war -- The ringlet -- Lines: Long as the heart beats life within her breast -- 1865-1866 -- Stanza, contributed to the 'Shakespearean show-book' -- Compromise -- Experiment in Sapphic metre."
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