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Poetry after Auschwitz : remembering what one never knew

Autor: Susan Gubar
Editorial: Bloomington : Indiana University Press, ©2003.
Serie: Jewish literature and culture.
Edición/Formato:   Print book : Publicación gubernamental estatal o provincial : Inglés (eng)Ver todas las ediciones y todos los formatos
Base de datos:WorldCat
Resumen:
"In this study Susan Gubar demonstrates that Theodor Adorno's famous injunction against writing poetry after Auschwitz paradoxically inspired an ongoing literary tradition. From the 1960s to the present, as the Shoah receded into a more remote European past, North American and British writers struggled to keep memory of it alive."
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Género/Forma: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Tipo de material: Publicación gubernamental, Publicación gubernamental estatal o provincial, Recurso en Internet
Tipo de documento: Libro/Texto, Recurso en Internet
Todos autores / colaboradores: Susan Gubar
ISBN: 0253341760 9780253341761
Número OCLC: 49415855
Descripción: xxi, 313 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Contenido: The Holocaust is dying --
Masters of disaster --
Suckled by panic --
About pictures out of focus --
Documentary verse bears witness --
The dead speak --
"Could you have made an elegy for every one?" --
Poetry and survival.
Título de la serie: Jewish literature and culture.
Responsabilidad: Susan Gubar.
Más información:

Resumen:

Eloquent exploration of Holocaust verse in English by one of America's leading feminist critics.  Leer más

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"It is hard to imagine [Susan Gubar] bettering her previous work, but this is a culmination... It will become a classic for the way it is written, for its sense of what poetry in general can do, and Leer más

 
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Datos enlazados


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schema:description"The Holocaust is dying -- Masters of disaster -- Suckled by panic -- About pictures out of focus -- Documentary verse bears witness -- The dead speak -- "Could you have made an elegy for every one?" -- Poetry and survival."@en
schema:description""Many contemporary writers - among them Anthony Hecht, Gerald Stern, Sylvia Plath, William Heyen, Michael Hamburger, Irena Klepfisz, Adrienne Rich, Jorie Graham, Jacqueline Osherow, and Anne Michaels - have grappled with personal and political, ethical and aesthetic consequences of the disaster. Through confessional verse and reinventions of the elegy, as well as documentary poems about photographs and trials, poets serve as proxy-witnesses of events that they did not experience firsthand. By speaking about or even as the dead, these men and women of letters elucidate what it means to cite, reconfigure, consume, or envy the traumatic memories of an earlier generation."--Jacket."@en
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