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Policing L.A.'s skid row : crime and real estate development in downtown Los Angeles [an experiment in real time]

Author: Bernard E Harcourt; University of Chicago. Law School.
Publisher: [Chicago, Ill.] : Law School, the University of Chicago, [2005]
Series: Public law and legal theory working paper, no. 92.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Did the NYPD's "broken windows" policing really lead the urban renewal in New York City? Or was it the other way around? Were the leaders or instigators, instead, high-end commercial and residential real estate developers? Or the urban planers who, many years earlier in the late 1970s and 1980s, designated this blighted area for massive development? Could it be that real estate redevelopment reconfigures crime  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Case studies
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Bernard E Harcourt; University of Chicago. Law School.
OCLC Number: 124093408
Notes: Cover title.
"May 2005."
"Forthcoming in the University of Chicago Llegal Forum Volume 2005"--P. 2.
Title from homepage, University of Chicago Law School (viewed May 9, 2007).
Reproduction Notes: Electronic reproduction. Chicago, Ill. : Law School, University of Chicago, 2006. Available via the World Wide Web.
Description: 68 p.
Details: Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Series Title: Public law and legal theory working paper, no. 92.
Responsibility: Bernard E. Harcourt.

Abstract:

"Did the NYPD's "broken windows" policing really lead the urban renewal in New York City? Or was it the other way around? Were the leaders or instigators, instead, high-end commercial and residential real estate developers? Or the urban planers who, many years earlier in the late 1970s and 1980s, designated this blighted area for massive development? Could it be that real estate redevelopment reconfigures crime patterns in disorderly neighborhoods, producing crime reduction? In this essay, I explore the latter hypothesis. I suggest that the focus on the police does not do justice to the processual dynamics of how a neighborhood is redeveloped, gentrified, or commercialized. It does not begin to scratch at the dynamic relationship between real estate redevelopment and crime. There are crucial intervening steps. And in the more complete story, the most important players are high-end commercial and residential real estate developers, city urban planners, and non-profit housing advocates for the homeless. The police and their policing are ancillary. In this article, I offer a preliminary snapshot, a rich description of the present condition of L.A's Skid Row. I emphasize that this is an experiment in real time because the changes are occurring as I write, and neither I nor anyone else knows how L.A.'s Skid Row will ultimately evolve, if at all ..."

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Linked Data


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