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[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. John F. Kennedy visits with three women who have lost their sons to war, Newport, Kentucky--unedited footage and the spot itself]. Preview this item
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[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. John F. Kennedy visits with three women who have lost their sons to war, Newport, Kentucky--unedited footage and the spot itself].

Author: John F Kennedy; Jack Denove; Citizens for Kennedy (Organization)
Publisher: [1960]
Edition/Format:   Film : Film   Visual material : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In Newport, Kentucky, Mrs. Stiles, Mrs. Shay, and Mrs. Wagner, each of whom lost a son to war, are seated at a dining table, awaiting Senator Kennedy's arrival. They arrange the table, have coffee poured, note the arrival of a charter bus, and that "the kids are all out there screaming" (with enthusiasm at Kennedy's appearance out front). They rise to greet Kennedy when he enters the room. Introductions are made all  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Unedited footage
Political spots
UCLA preservation
Named Person: John F Kennedy; John F Kennedy
Material Type: Film
Document Type: Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: John F Kennedy; Jack Denove; Citizens for Kennedy (Organization)
OCLC Number: 423417816
Notes: Footage shot for Kennedy's Gold Star mothers political spot, including a take of the 4-minute spot itself.
Title supplied by cataloger.
Alternate title on some Archive records: Gold star.
Probably produced by Jack Denove. The spot itself concludes with a voice over credit: "Presented by Citizens for Kennedy."
Other Titles: Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. Gold star.

Abstract:

In Newport, Kentucky, Mrs. Stiles, Mrs. Shay, and Mrs. Wagner, each of whom lost a son to war, are seated at a dining table, awaiting Senator Kennedy's arrival. They arrange the table, have coffee poured, note the arrival of a charter bus, and that "the kids are all out there screaming" (with enthusiasm at Kennedy's appearance out front). They rise to greet Kennedy when he enters the room. Introductions are made all around; Kennedy combs his hair. The Gold Star mothers discuss with Kennedy their sons' military service and death. The director instructs Kennedy on how to proceed, the subject matter to be discussed, the length of the spot, how to sustain the discussion for that length of time, etc. Kennedy confirms names and hometowns. To begin the spot itself, Kennedy introduces himself, then the three women, explaining that each lost a son to war. Each woman speaks briefly about her son's military service and death. Kennedy states his own brother died in service, and that peace is a central concern of the 1960s. Khrushchev is unstable and the Chinese Communists have dedicated themselves to destruction of the U.S., believing that war is the way to communize the world. The best way to maintain peace is to be strong and to make sure that lines of commitment are clearly drawn and known. He cites examples of Hitler and North Korea. He looks with some optimism at the chances of maintaining peace in the sixties. If elected, he will devote all his energies to that. "We've had enough war." The women concur; Mrs. Stiles says she has three grown grandsons and wouldn't want anything to happen to them. Kennedy is hopeful that if the U.S. can keep its strength and nerves and persevere, the country can remain at peace. "John Kennedy, a man who knows the suffering of war but who is dedicated to the pursuit of peace ... This country needs new American leadership; the world needs it. John Kennedy for president"--Voice over. Spot is followed by 15 seconds of fragments.

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Linked Data


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schema:description"In Newport, Kentucky, Mrs. Stiles, Mrs. Shay, and Mrs. Wagner, each of whom lost a son to war, are seated at a dining table, awaiting Senator Kennedy's arrival. They arrange the table, have coffee poured, note the arrival of a charter bus, and that "the kids are all out there screaming" (with enthusiasm at Kennedy's appearance out front). They rise to greet Kennedy when he enters the room. Introductions are made all around; Kennedy combs his hair. The Gold Star mothers discuss with Kennedy their sons' military service and death. The director instructs Kennedy on how to proceed, the subject matter to be discussed, the length of the spot, how to sustain the discussion for that length of time, etc. Kennedy confirms names and hometowns. To begin the spot itself, Kennedy introduces himself, then the three women, explaining that each lost a son to war. Each woman speaks briefly about her son's military service and death. Kennedy states his own brother died in service, and that peace is a central concern of the 1960s. Khrushchev is unstable and the Chinese Communists have dedicated themselves to destruction of the U.S., believing that war is the way to communize the world. The best way to maintain peace is to be strong and to make sure that lines of commitment are clearly drawn and known. He cites examples of Hitler and North Korea. He looks with some optimism at the chances of maintaining peace in the sixties. If elected, he will devote all his energies to that. "We've had enough war." The women concur; Mrs. Stiles says she has three grown grandsons and wouldn't want anything to happen to them. Kennedy is hopeful that if the U.S. can keep its strength and nerves and persevere, the country can remain at peace. "John Kennedy, a man who knows the suffering of war but who is dedicated to the pursuit of peace ... This country needs new American leadership; the world needs it. John Kennedy for president"--Voice over. Spot is followed by 15 seconds of fragments."
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schema:name"[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. John F. Kennedy visits with three women who have lost their sons to war, Newport, Kentucky--unedited footage and the spot itself]."
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