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The politics of resentment : British Columbia regionalism and Canadian unity

Author: Philip Resnick; Institute for Research on Public Policy.
Publisher: Vancouver : UBC Press, ©2000.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"The Politics of Resentment is the first book to examine the role that British Columbia has played in the evolving Canadian unity debate. Philip Resnick explores what makes British Columbia stand apart as a region of Canada. He looks at the views of politicians, opinionmakers, and ordinary British Columbians on their sense of estrangement from central Canada, on the challenges posed by Quebec nationalism, and on  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Resnick, Philip.
Politics of resentment.
Vancouver : UBC Press, c2000
(OCoLC)604429186
Online version:
Resnick, Philip.
Politics of resentment.
Vancouver : UBC Press, c2000
(OCoLC)606379900
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Philip Resnick; Institute for Research on Public Policy.
ISBN: 0774808047 9780774808040 0774808055 9780774808057
OCLC Number: 43929991
Notes: "An Institute for Research on Public Policy book published by UBC Press."
Description: xii, 172 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: British Columbia as a Distinct Region of Canada --
British Columbia Political Leaders and Canadian Unity --
British Columbia Opinion-Makers and Canadian Unity --
Vox Populi: British Columbia Public Opinion and Canadian Unity / Victor Armony --
A Region-Province? --
What If?.
Responsibility: Philip Resnick.

Abstract:

An examination of the role that British Columbia has played in the evolving Canadian unity debate. Philip Resnick explores what makes British Columbia stand apart as a region of Canada and looks at  Read more...

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schema:reviewBody""The Politics of Resentment is the first book to examine the role that British Columbia has played in the evolving Canadian unity debate. Philip Resnick explores what makes British Columbia stand apart as a region of Canada. He looks at the views of politicians, opinionmakers, and ordinary British Columbians on their sense of estrangement from central Canada, on the challenges posed by Quebec nationalism, and on what they see as the future of Canadian unity. He concludes with an examination of the likely BC response in the event of a "yes" vote in any future Quebec referendum on sovereignty." "The Politics of Resentment provides a new way of thinking about British Columbia's place within the Canadian federation. It draws on a wide range of sources - government documents and media sources, the work of BC authors and commentators, and academic literature on regionalism and nationalism - to capture what underlies the often-fractured relationship between Canada's westernmost province and the rest of the country."--BOOK JACKET."
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