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Population: the first essay.

Author: מלתוס, תומס רוברט, ; T R Malthus
Publisher: [Ann Arbor] University of Michigan Press [1959]
Series: Ann Arbor paperbacks.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Malthus, T.R. (Thomas Robert), 1766-1834.
Population.
[Ann Arbor] University of Michigan Press [1959]
(OCoLC)607175720
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: מלתוס, תומס רוברט, ; T R Malthus
OCLC Number: 169256
Notes: Originally published in 1798 under title: An essay on the principle of population.
Description: xix, 139 pages 21 cm.
Contents: Nature of the difficulty arising from population --
The different ratio in which population and food increase --
Oscillation produced by them in the condition of the lower classes of society --
The savage or hunter state shortly reviewed --
The shepherd state, or the tribes of barbarians that overran the Roman Empire --
The superiority of the power of population to the means of subsistence --
the cause of the great tide of Northern Emigration --
The two principal checks to population --
The first, or preventive check examined with regard to England --
The second, or positive check to population examined, in England --
The powerful tendency of the poor laws to defeat their own purpose --
The absolute impossibility, from the fixed laws of our nature, that the pressure of want can ever be completely removed from the lower classes of society --
All the checks to population may be resolved into misery or vice --
New colonies --
Reasons for their rapid increase --
North American Colonies --
Extraordinary instance of increase in the back settlements --
A probable cause of epidemics --
Best criterion of a permanent increase of population --
Great frugality of living one of the causes of the famines of China and Indostan --
Only one proper way of encouraging population --
Causes of the Happiness of nations --
Famine, the last and most dreadful mode by which nature represses a redundant population --
Condorcet's conjecture concerning the organic perfectibility of man, and the indefinite prolongation of human life --
Fallacy of the argument, which infers an unlimited progress from a partial improvement, the limit of which cannot be ascertained, illustrated in the breeding of animals, and the cultivation of plants --
Godwin's system of equality --
Error of attributing all the vices of mankind to human institutions.
Series Title: Ann Arbor paperbacks.
Other Titles: Essay on the principle of population
Responsibility: With a foreword by Kenneth E. Boulding.

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