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Portraiture and politics in New York City, 1790-1825 : Gilbert Stuart, John Vanderlyn, John Trumbull, and Wesley Jarvis

Author: Bryan J Zygmont
Publisher: Saarbrücken, Germany : VDM Verlag Dr. Müller, ©2008
Edition/Format:   Book : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Published version of the author's thesis (Ph.D. -- University of Maryland, College Park, 2006), a study of four prominent portraitists active in New York City between 1790 and 1825. Despite working in the same location, these artists had different training, developed distinct aesthetics, and often worked for distinct groups of patrons. Gilbert Stuart returned to the United States in 1793 and established himself as  Read more...
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Named Person: Gilbert Stuart; John Vanderlyn; John Trumbull; John Wesley Jarvis
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Bryan J Zygmont
ISBN: 9783639089097 363908909X
OCLC Number: 295461917
Description: 246 p. ; 23 cm.
Contents: ch. 1. Introduction --
ch. 2. The triumphal return of Gilbert Stuart: portraiture before the political fray --
ch. 3. John Vanderlyn and Aaron Burr: portraiture of the Democratic-Republicans --
ch. 4. John Trumbull and the English aesthetic: portraiture of the New York Federalists --
ch. 5. John Wesley Jarvis and the middle ground: "moderate" portraiture surrounding the War of 1812 --
Conclusion.
Responsibility: Bryan J. Zygmont.

Abstract:

Published version of the author's thesis (Ph.D. -- University of Maryland, College Park, 2006), a study of four prominent portraitists active in New York City between 1790 and 1825. Despite working in the same location, these artists had different training, developed distinct aesthetics, and often worked for distinct groups of patrons. Gilbert Stuart returned to the United States in 1793 and established himself as the preeminent portraitist in New York City. This coincided with a moment of political harmony in the United States. John Vanderlyn received most of his training in Paris in the studio of a prominent French neoclassicist. When Vanderlyn returned to New York City, Democratic-Republicans, politicians who wished to tie the diplomatic future of the United States to France, quickly embraced his French aesthetic. Conversely, Federalists who wished to further tie America to Great Britain preferred John Trumbull's English style. John Wesley Jarvis did not receive European training and instead developed an aesthetic that was quickly embraced by individuals who did not wish their portrait to express political alignment. This neutrality was one reason why members of the military preferred Jarvis over his more politically inclined competitors.

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Linked Data


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