skip to content
Portraiture in New Spain, 1600-1800: Painters, Patrons and Politics in Viceregal Mexico. Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Portraiture in New Spain, 1600-1800: Painters, Patrons and Politics in Viceregal Mexico.

Author: Michael A Brown; Jonathan Brown; Edward J Sullivan; Alexander Nagel
Publisher: 2011.
Dissertation: Ph. D. New York University 2011
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Document : Thesis/dissertation : eBook   Computer File : EnglishView all editions and formats
Publication:Dissertation Abstracts International, 72-06A.
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This dissertation charts some of the most significant events for the development of portrait-painting in New Spain in order to shed light on a problematic genre that is often overlooked or misunderstood, even by scholars in the field. The first chapter examines the corporate portrait in early seventeenth-century Mexico City, specifically the series of canvases depicting archbishops in the cathedral chapter hall, and
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Dissertations, Academic
Academic theses
Material Type: Document, Thesis/dissertation, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Michael A Brown; Jonathan Brown; Edward J Sullivan; Alexander Nagel
ISBN: 9781124544236 1124544232
OCLC Number: 776818848
Notes: Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 72-06, Section: A, page: 1811.
Adviser: Jonathan Brown.
Description: 1 online resource (327 pages)

Abstract:

This dissertation charts some of the most significant events for the development of portrait-painting in New Spain in order to shed light on a problematic genre that is often overlooked or misunderstood, even by scholars in the field. The first chapter examines the corporate portrait in early seventeenth-century Mexico City, specifically the series of canvases depicting archbishops in the cathedral chapter hall, and the role of the painter as an arbiter of taste. The second chapter investigates the persistence of this established model, which was a narrowly constructed and exclusively male tradition, which lasted a century and a half. The third chapter discusses the extraordinary innovations of the early eighteenth century. As a result of many factors, including profound economic and social changes, there began an explosion of portrait commissions after 1700, especially in the previously ignored spheres of women and family. The final chapter deals with the foundation of the Academy in Mexico and its role in the Bourbon effort to retain control over its dominion by re-imposing artistic taste in the colony. One of the strategies employed to this end was the importation of a generation of Spanish artists trained at the Academy in Madrid.

Portraiture in the viceroyalties, like the court culture of its government seats in Mexico City and Lima, was inherently conservative, concerned as it was with the shaky balance of power that defined colonial politics and society. Once the formula of state portraiture was established in New Spain, it remained fairly uniform because of the inherent demands of such patrons. The first portrait commissions were for series of statesmen; later depictions needed to comply with and consolidate this corporate template. In this way, portraiture in New Spain developed differently than it had in Europe because its tradition was so firmly rooted in the series of viceroys and prelates. Instead of developing along the art-historical arc that characterizes many parts of Europe, portraiture in New Spain followed a different course.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Related Subjects:(2)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/776818848> # Portraiture in New Spain, 1600-1800: Painters, Patrons and Politics in Viceregal Mexico.
    a schema:Book, schema:MediaObject, schema:CreativeWork, pto:Web_document, bgn:Thesis ;
   bgn:inSupportOf "" ;
   library:oclcnum "776818848" ;
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1080012878#Topic/art_history> ; # Art History
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1080012878#Topic/history_latin_american> ; # History, Latin American
   schema:contributor <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1080012878#Person/nagel_alexander> ; # Alexander Nagel
   schema:contributor <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1080012878#Person/brown_jonathan> ; # Jonathan Brown
   schema:contributor <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1080012878#Person/sullivan_edward_j> ; # Edward J. Sullivan
   schema:creator <http://viaf.org/viaf/306393888> ; # Michael A. Brown
   schema:datePublished "2011" ;
   schema:description "Portraiture in the viceroyalties, like the court culture of its government seats in Mexico City and Lima, was inherently conservative, concerned as it was with the shaky balance of power that defined colonial politics and society. Once the formula of state portraiture was established in New Spain, it remained fairly uniform because of the inherent demands of such patrons. The first portrait commissions were for series of statesmen; later depictions needed to comply with and consolidate this corporate template. In this way, portraiture in New Spain developed differently than it had in Europe because its tradition was so firmly rooted in the series of viceroys and prelates. Instead of developing along the art-historical arc that characterizes many parts of Europe, portraiture in New Spain followed a different course."@en ;
   schema:description "This dissertation charts some of the most significant events for the development of portrait-painting in New Spain in order to shed light on a problematic genre that is often overlooked or misunderstood, even by scholars in the field. The first chapter examines the corporate portrait in early seventeenth-century Mexico City, specifically the series of canvases depicting archbishops in the cathedral chapter hall, and the role of the painter as an arbiter of taste. The second chapter investigates the persistence of this established model, which was a narrowly constructed and exclusively male tradition, which lasted a century and a half. The third chapter discusses the extraordinary innovations of the early eighteenth century. As a result of many factors, including profound economic and social changes, there began an explosion of portrait commissions after 1700, especially in the previously ignored spheres of women and family. The final chapter deals with the foundation of the Academy in Mexico and its role in the Bourbon effort to retain control over its dominion by re-imposing artistic taste in the colony. One of the strategies employed to this end was the importation of a generation of Spanish artists trained at the Academy in Madrid."@en ;
   schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1080012878> ;
   schema:genre "Dissertations, Academic"@en ;
   schema:genre "Academic theses"@en ;
   schema:inLanguage "en" ;
   schema:name "Portraiture in New Spain, 1600-1800: Painters, Patrons and Politics in Viceregal Mexico."@en ;
   schema:productID "776818848" ;
   schema:publication <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/776818848#PublicationEvent/2011> ;
   schema:url <http://public.eblib.com/choice/PublicFullRecord.aspx?p=3393186> ;
   schema:url <http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqdiss&rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:3445271> ;
   schema:workExample <http://worldcat.org/isbn/9781124544236> ;
   wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/776818848> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1080012878#Person/brown_jonathan> # Jonathan Brown
    a schema:Person ;
   schema:familyName "Brown" ;
   schema:givenName "Jonathan" ;
   schema:name "Jonathan Brown" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1080012878#Person/nagel_alexander> # Alexander Nagel
    a schema:Person ;
   schema:familyName "Nagel" ;
   schema:givenName "Alexander" ;
   schema:name "Alexander Nagel" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1080012878#Person/sullivan_edward_j> # Edward J. Sullivan
    a schema:Person ;
   schema:familyName "Sullivan" ;
   schema:givenName "Edward J." ;
   schema:name "Edward J. Sullivan" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/1080012878#Topic/history_latin_american> # History, Latin American
    a schema:Intangible ;
   schema:name "History, Latin American"@en ;
    .

<http://viaf.org/viaf/306393888> # Michael A. Brown
    a schema:Person ;
   schema:birthDate "1974" ;
   schema:familyName "Brown" ;
   schema:givenName "Michael A." ;
   schema:name "Michael A. Brown" ;
    .

<http://worldcat.org/isbn/9781124544236>
    a schema:ProductModel ;
   schema:isbn "1124544232" ;
   schema:isbn "9781124544236" ;
    .

<http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/776818848>
    a genont:InformationResource, genont:ContentTypeGenericResource ;
   schema:about <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/776818848> ; # Portraiture in New Spain, 1600-1800: Painters, Patrons and Politics in Viceregal Mexico.
   schema:dateModified "2017-09-02" ;
   void:inDataset <http://purl.oclc.org/dataset/WorldCat> ;
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.