skip to content
Pottery and piety : a reassessment of the potters and pottery of Moravian Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, 1743-1768 Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Pottery and piety : a reassessment of the potters and pottery of Moravian Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, 1743-1768

Author: Brenda Heindl
Publisher: 2010.
Dissertation: Thesis (M.A.)--University of Delaware, 2010.
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : eBook : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The Moravian community of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, was organized as an artisanal community, to allow individuals to move in and out of the community as missionaries whenever necessary. Unhinged from a rigid agricultural schedule, Bethlehem thrived with upwards of forty different trades by the mid-eighteenth century. Among the many trades plied in Bethlehem was the pottery works, started as early as 1743. Despite  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Material Type: Thesis/dissertation, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Brenda Heindl
OCLC Number: 680472027
Notes: Principal faculty advisors: Rosemary E. Krill, Museum Studies Program; and Leslie Grigsby, Winterthur Museum.
Details: Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Responsibility: Brenda. Heindl.

Abstract:

The Moravian community of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, was organized as an artisanal community, to allow individuals to move in and out of the community as missionaries whenever necessary. Unhinged from a rigid agricultural schedule, Bethlehem thrived with upwards of forty different trades by the mid-eighteenth century. Among the many trades plied in Bethlehem was the pottery works, started as early as 1743. Despite apparent isolation of this frontier town, the community's Moravian potters supported the economic and missionary functions of the church. Just as importantly, although Bethlehem was a tightly woven economic religious settlement, its goods -- including distinctive pottery -- reached a great number of local, regional, and, perhaps, transoceanic consumers. Though a part of Pennsylvania's frontier, Bethlehem operated as a center of commerce and manufacturing. The community was tightly woven into a network of traders from New York, Philadelphia, as well as Great Britain, Europe, and the West Indies. Archaeological evidence provides insight into the designs of the pottery likely made in Bethlehem. Through records and archaeological materials related to the pottery works of Moravian Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, this thesis is an attempt to explore the complexities of how trade, manufacture, community, culture, and religion interacted in eighteenth-century southeastern Pennsylvania.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/680472027>
library:oclcnum"680472027"
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/680472027>
rdf:typej.1:Thesis
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2010"
schema:description"The Moravian community of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, was organized as an artisanal community, to allow individuals to move in and out of the community as missionaries whenever necessary. Unhinged from a rigid agricultural schedule, Bethlehem thrived with upwards of forty different trades by the mid-eighteenth century. Among the many trades plied in Bethlehem was the pottery works, started as early as 1743. Despite apparent isolation of this frontier town, the community's Moravian potters supported the economic and missionary functions of the church. Just as importantly, although Bethlehem was a tightly woven economic religious settlement, its goods -- including distinctive pottery -- reached a great number of local, regional, and, perhaps, transoceanic consumers. Though a part of Pennsylvania's frontier, Bethlehem operated as a center of commerce and manufacturing. The community was tightly woven into a network of traders from New York, Philadelphia, as well as Great Britain, Europe, and the West Indies. Archaeological evidence provides insight into the designs of the pottery likely made in Bethlehem. Through records and archaeological materials related to the pottery works of Moravian Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, this thesis is an attempt to explore the complexities of how trade, manufacture, community, culture, and religion interacted in eighteenth-century southeastern Pennsylvania."
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/702231357>
schema:genre"History"
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Pottery and piety a reassessment of the potters and pottery of Moravian Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, 1743-1768"
schema:url

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.