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The power problem : how American military dominance makes us less safe, less prosperous, and less free

Author: Christopher A Preble
Publisher: Ithaca : Cornell University Press, ©2009.
Series: Cornell studies in security affairs.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Preble explores the aims, costs, and limitations of the use of this nation's military power. He documents how the possession of vast military strength runs contrary to the original intent of the Founders, and has, as they feared, shifted the balance of power away from individual citizens and toward the central government, and from the legislative and judicial branches of government to the executive. In his estimate,  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Christopher A Preble
ISBN: 9780801447655 0801447658
OCLC Number: 283802750
Description: xiii, 212 pages ; 25 cm.
Contents: The U.S. military : dominant, but not omnipotent --
Tallying the costs of our military power --
It costs too much --
We use it too much --
The hegemon's dilemma --
Curing the power problem.
Series Title: Cornell studies in security affairs.
Responsibility: Christopher A. Preble.

Abstract:

Preble explores the aims, costs, and limitations of the use of this nation's military power. He documents how the possession of vast military strength runs contrary to the original intent of the Founders, and has, as they feared, shifted the balance of power away from individual citizens and toward the central government, and from the legislative and judicial branches of government to the executive. In his estimate, policymakers will constantly be tempted to over-reach and to redefine ever more broadly the "national interest." Possessing vast military power in order to further other objectives is, he asserts, illicit and to be resisted. If it does not advance U.S. security, then it undermines our security, imposes unneccessary costs, and forces all Americans to incur additional risks; then our military power is a problem. Washington's current eagerness to maintain and use an enormous and expensive military is corrosive to contemporary American democracy.

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